"Power concedes nothing without a demand.  It never did and it never will."  Frederick Douglass
 

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, April 2, 2015 – David Packard

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, April 2, 2015 – David Packard

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“Take risks. Ask big questions. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes; if you don’t make mistakes, you’re not reaching far enough.”

And

“Why are we here? I think many people assume, wrongly, that a company exists solely to make money. Money is an important part of a company’s existence, if the company is any good. But a result is not a cause. We have to go deeper and find the real reason for our being.”

And

“Marketing is too important to be left to the marketing department.”

And

“To remain static is to lose ground.”

And

“A group of people get together and exist as an institution we call a company so they are able to accomplish something collectively that they could not accomplish separately – they make a contribution to society, a phrase which sounds trite but is fundamental.”

And

“The greatest success goes to the person who is not afraid to fail in front of even the largest audience.”

And

“Set out to build a company and make a contribution, not an empire and a fortune.”

And

“A company that focuses solely on profits ultimately betrays both itself and society.”

And

11 Simple Rules

“1. Think first of the other fellow. This is THE foundation – the first requisite – for getting along with others. And it is the one truly difficult accomplishment you must make. Gaining this, the rest will be “a breeze.”

2. Build up the other person’s sense of importance. When we make the other person seem less important, we frustrate one of his deepest urges. Allow him to feel equality or superiority, and we can easily get along with him.

3. Respect the other man’s personality rights. Respect as something sacred the other fellow’s right to be different from you. No two personalities are ever molded by precisely the same forces.

4. Give sincere appreciation. If we think someone has done a thing well, we should never hesitate to let him know it. WARNING: This does not mean promiscuous use of obvious flattery. Flattery with most intelligent people gets exactly the reaction it deserves – contempt for the egotistical “phony” who stoops to it.

5. Eliminate the negative. Criticism seldom does what its user intends, for it invariably causes resentment. The tiniest bit of disapproval can sometimes cause a resentment which will rankle – to your disadvantage – for years.

6. Avoid openly trying to reform people. Every man knows he is imperfect, but he doesn’t want someone else trying to correct his faults. If you want to improve a person, help him to embrace a higher working goal – a standard, an ideal – and he will do his own “making over” far more effectively than you can do it for him.

7. Try to understand the other person. How would you react to similar circumstances? When you begin to see the “whys” of him you can’t help but get along better with him.

8. Check first impressions. We are especially prone to dislike some people on first sight because of some vague resemblance (of which we are usually unaware) to someone else whom we have had reason to dislike. Follow Abraham Lincoln’s famous self-instruction: “I do not like that man; therefore I shall get to know him better.”

9. Take care with the little details. Watch your smile, your tone of voice, how you use your eyes, the way you greet people, the use of nicknames and remembering faces, names and dates. Little things add polish to your skill in dealing with people. Constantly, deliberately think of them until they become a natural part of your personality.

10. Develop genuine interest in people. You cannot successfully apply the foregoing suggestions unless you have a sincere desire to like, respect, and be helpful to others. Conversely, you cannot build genuine interest in people until you have experienced the pleasure of working with them in an atmosphere characterized by mutual liking and respect.

11. Keep it up. That’s all—just keep it up!”

Wikipedia:  David Packard, Stanford University BA (1934), MA (1939)

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, April 1, 2015 – Mark Twain

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, April 1, 2015 – Mark Twain

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“At last the lake burst upon us–a noble sheet of blue water lifted six thousand three hundred feet above the level of the sea, and walled in by a rim of snow-clad mountain peaks that towered aloft three thousand feet higher still! As it lay there with the shadows of the mountains brilliantly photographed upon its still surface, I thought it must surely be the fairest picture the whole world affords.”  Mark Twain on Lake Tahoe, Roughing It, 1861

And

“It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native criminal class except Congress.”

And

“Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.”

And

“Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.”

And

“It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt.”

And

“A man is never more truthful than when he acknowledges himself a liar.”

And

“A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. “

And

“In the first place, God made idiots. That was for practice. Then he made school boards.”

And

“Good friends, good books and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”

And

“Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.”

And

“Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.”

And

“Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today.”

And

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear.”

And

“Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.”

And

“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”

And

“Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.”

And

“There are lies, damned lies and statistics.”

And

“The lack of money is the root of all evil.”

And

“A man’s character may be learned from the adjectives which he habitually uses in conversation.”

And

“When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.”

And

“All you need is ignorance and confidence and the success is sure.”

And

“My mother had a great deal of trouble with me, but I think she enjoyed it.”

And

“The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d rather not.”

And

“The most interesting information comes from children, for they tell all they know and then stop.”

And

“Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen.”

And

“Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.”

And

“The trouble ain’t that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain’t distributed right.”

And

“I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.”

And

“Substitute “damn” every time you’re inclined to write “very”; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”

And

“When angry, count to four; when very angry, swear.”

And

“Don’t tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish.”

And

‘There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded.”

And

“A person with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds.”

And

“I don’t give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way.”

And

“Let us live so that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.”

And

“It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.”

And

“It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.”

And

“The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug.”

And

“The man who is a pessimist before 48 knows too much; if he is an optimist after it, he knows too little.”

And

“The public is the only critic whose opinion is worth anything at all.”

And

“I haven’t a particle of confidence in a man who has no redeeming petty vices whatsoever.”

And

‘Reader, suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.”

And

“The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter—’tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.”

And

“Humor is the great thing, the saving thing. The minute it crops up, all our hardnesses yield, all our irritations and resentments flit away and a sunny spirit takes their place.”

And

“I was sorry to have my name mentioned as one of the great authors, because they have a sad habit of dying off. Chaucer is dead, Spencer is dead, so is Milton, so is Shakespeare, and I’m not feeling so well myself.”

And

“Always do right. This will gratify some people, and astonish the rest.”

And

“The only reason why God created man is because he was disappointed with the monkey.”

And

“Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”

And

“Always acknowledge a fault frankly. This will throw those in authority off their guard and give you opportunity to commit more.”

And

“Thousands of geniuses live and die undiscovered — either by themselves or by others. But for the Civil War, Lincoln and Grant and Sherman and Sheridan would not have been discovered, nor have risen into notice. … I have touched upon this matter in a small book which I wrote a generation ago and which I have not published as yet — Captain Stormfield’s Visit to Heaven. When Stormfield arrived in heaven he … was told that … a shoemaker … was the most prodigious military genius the planet had ever produced.”

And

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.” The Innocents Abroad, 1869

And

“He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it — namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to obtain.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

And

“Work consists of whatever a body is OBLIGED to do, and…Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

And

“France has neither winter nor summer nor morals. Apart from these drawbacks it is a fine country.”

And

“Familiarity breeds contempt — and children.”

And

“In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot”

And

“Never let your schooling interfere with your education.”

And

“Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.”

Wikipedia:  Mark Twain

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, March 31, 2015 – John Steinbeck

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, March 31, 2015 – John Steinbeck

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“A journey is a person in itself; no two are alike. And all plans, safeguards, policing, and coercion are fruitless. We find that after years of struggle that we do not take a trip; a trip takes us.”

And

“A journey is like marriage. The certain way to be wrong is to think you control it.”

And

“I am impelled, not to squeak like a grateful and apologetic mouse, but to roar like a lion out of pride in my profession.”

And

“I have never smuggled anything in my life. Why, then, do I feel an uneasy sense of guilt on approaching a customs barrier?”

And

“I’ve lived in good climate, and it bores the hell out of me. I like weather rather than climate.”

And

“I’ve seen a look in dogs’ eyes, a quickly vanishing look of amazed contempt, and I am convinced that basically dogs think humans are nuts.”

And

“Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen.”

And

“If you’re in trouble, or hurt or need – go to the poor people. They’re the only ones that’ll help – the only ones.”

And

“In the souls of the people the grapes of wrath are filling and growing heavy, growing heavy for the vintage.”

And

“It has always been my private conviction that any man who puts his intelligence up against a fish and loses had it coming.”

And

“It has always seemed strange to me… the things we admire in men, kindness and generosity, openness, honesty, understanding and feeling, are the concomitants of failure in our system. And those traits we detest, sharpness, greed, acquisitiveness, meanness, egotism and self-interest, are the traits of success. And while men admire the quality of the first they love the produce of the second.”

And

“It is a common experience that a problem difficult at night is resolved in the morning after the committee of sleep has worked on it.”

And

“No man really knows about other human beings. The best he can do is to suppose that they are like himself.”

And

“Power does not corrupt. Fear corrupts… perhaps the fear of a loss of power.”

And

“Sectional football games have the glory and the despair of war, and when a Texas team takes the field against a foreign state, it is an army with banners.”

And

“The writer must believe that what he is doing is the most important thing in the world. And he must hold to this illusion even when he knows it is not true.”

And

“We spend our time searching for security and hate it when we get it.”

And

“Where does discontent start? You are warm enough, but you shiver. You are fed, yet hunger gnaws you. You have been loved, but your yearning wanders in new fields. And to prod all these there’s time, the Bastard Time.”

And

“Writers are a little below clowns and a little above trained seals.”

And

“We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — ”Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.””

And

“One man was so mad at me that he ended his letter: “Beware. You will never get out of this world alive.””

And

“If I wanted to destroy a nation, I would give it too much and I would have it on its knees, miserable, greedy and sick.”

And

“Man, unlike anything organic or inorganic in the universe, grows beyond his work, walks up the stairs of his concepts, emerges ahead of his accomplishments.”

And

“Cannery Row in Monterey in California is a poem, a stink, a grating noise, a quality of light, a tone, a habit, a nostalgia, a dream.”

And

“And this I believe: that the free, exploring mind of the individual human is the most valuable thing in the world. And this I would fight for: the freedom of the mind to take any direction it wishes, undirected. And this I must fight against: any religion, or government which limits or destroys the individual. This is what I am and what I am about. I can understand why a system built on a pattern must try to destroy the free mind, for it is the one thing which can by inspection destroy such a system. Surely I can understand this, and I hate it and I will fight against it to preserve the one thing that separates us from the uncreative beasts. If the glory can be killed, we are lost.”

And

“In every bit of honest writing in the world … there is a base theme. Try to understand men, if you understand each other you will be kind to each other. Knowing a man well never leads to hate and nearly always leads to love. There are shorter means, many of them. there is writing promoting social change, writing punishing injustice, writing in celebration of heroism, but always that base theme. Try to understand each other.”

And

“I have come to believe that a great teacher is a great artist and that there are as few as there are any other great artists. It might even be the greatest of the arts since the medium is the human mind and spirit.”

And

“The profession of book-writing makes horse-racing seem like a solid, stable business.”

And

“Our species is the only creative species, and it has only one creative instrument, the individual mind and spirit of a man. Nothing was ever created by two men. There are no good collaborations, whether in art, in music, in poetry, in mathematics, in philosophy. Once the miracle of creation has taken place, the group can build and extend it, but the group never invents anything. The preciousness lies in the lonely mind of a man.”

And

“It seems to me that if you or I must choose between two courses of thought or action, we should remember our dying and try so to live that our death brings no pleasure on the world.”

And

“I guess this is why I hate governments. It is always the rule, the fine print, carried out by the fine print men. There’s nothing to fight, no wall to hammer with frustrated fists.

And

Excerpt from Travels with Charley, John Steinbeck

The next passage in my journey is a love affair. I am in love with Montana. For other states I have admiration, respect, recognition, even some affection, but with Montana it is love, and it’s difficult to analyze love when you’re in it. Once, when I raptured in a violet glow given off by the Queen of the World, my father asked me why, and I thought he was crazy not to see. Of course I know now she was a mouse-haired, freckle-nosed, scabby-kneed little girl with a voice like a bat and the loving kindness of a gila monster, but then she lighted up the landscape and me. It seems to me that Montana is a great splash of grandeur. The scale is huge but not overpowering. The land is rich with grass and color, and the mountains are the kind I would create if mountains were ever put on my agenda. Montana seems to me to be what a small boy would think Texas is like from hearing Texans. Here for the first time I heard a definite regional accent unaffected by TV-ese, a slow-paced warm speech. It seemed to me that the frantic bustle of America was not in Montana. Its people did not seem afraid of shadows in a John Birch Society sense. The calm of the mountains and the rolling grasslands had got into the inhabitants. It was hunting season when I drove through the state. The men I talked to seemed to me not moved to a riot of seasonal slaughter but simply to be going out to kill edible meat. Again my attitude may be informed by love, but it seemed to me that the towns were places to live in rather than nervous hives. People had time to pause in their occupations to undertake the passing art of neighborliness.

I found I did not rush through the towns to get them over with. I even found things I had to buy to make myself linger. In Billings I bought a hat, in Livingston a jacket, in Butte a rifle I didn’t particularly need, a Remington bolt-action .22, secondhand but in beautiful condition. Then I found a telescope sight I had to have, and waited while it was mounted on the rifle, and in the process got to know everyone in the shop and any customers who entered. With the gun in a vise and the bolt out, we zeroed the new sight on a chimney three blocks away, and later when I got to shooting the little gun I found no reason to change it. I spent a good part of a morning at this, mostly because I wanted to stay. But I see that, as usual, love is inarticulate. Montana has a spell on me. It is grandeur and warmth. If Montana had a seacoast, or if I could live away from the sea, I would instantly move there and petition for admission. Of all the states it is my favorite and my love.

At Custer we made a side trip south to pay our respects to General Custer and Sitting Bull on the battlefield of Little Big Horn. I don’t suppose there is an American who doesn’t carry Remington’s painting of the last defense of the center column of the 7th Cavalry in his head. I removed my hat in memory of brave men, and Charley saluted in his own manner but I thought with great respect.

The whole of eastern Montana and the western Dakotas is memory-marked as Injun country, and the memories are not very old either. Some years ago my neighbor was Charles Erskine Scott Wood, who wrote Heavenly Discourse. He was a very old man when I knew him, but as a young lieutenant just out of military academy he had been assigned to General Miles and he served in the Chief Joseph campaign. His memory of it was very clear and very sad. He said it was one of the most gallant retreats in all history. Chief Joseph and the Nez Percés with squaws and children, dogs, and all their possessions, retreated under heavy fire for over a thousand miles, trying to escape to Canada. Wood said they fought every step of the way against odds until finally they were surrounded by the cavalry under General Miles and the large part of them wiped out. It was the saddest duty he had ever performed, Wood said, and he had never lost his respect for the fighting qualities of the Nez Percés. “If they hadn’t had their families with them we could never have caught them,” he said. “And if we had been evenly matched in men and weapons, we couldn’t have beaten them. They were men,” he said, “Real men.”

Wikipedia: John Steinbeck

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Monday, March 30, 2015 – Ernest Hemingway

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Monday, March 30, 2015 – Ernest Hemingway

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“Always do sober what you said you’d do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut.”

And

“I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen.”

And

“Somebody just back of you while you are fishing is as bad as someone looking over your shoulder while you write a letter to your girl.”

And

“When I have an idea, I turn down the flame, as if it were a little alcohol stove, as low as it will go. Then it explodes and that is my idea.”

And

“Forget your personal tragedy. We are all bitched from the start and you especially have to be hurt like hell before you can write seriously. But when you get the damned hurt use it — don’t cheat with it.”

And

“The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” A Farewell to Arms

And

“If we win here we will win everywhere. The world is a fine place and worth the fighting for and I hate very much to leave it.” For Whom the Bell Tolls

And

“Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today. It’s been that way all this year. It’s been that way so many times. All of war is that way.” For Whom the Bell Tolls

And

“Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.” The Old Man and the Sea

And

“Write me at the Hotel Quintana, Pamplona, Spain. Or don’t you like to write letters. I do because it’s such a swell way to keep from working and yet feel you’ve done something” Letter to F. Scott Fitzgerald, July 1, 1925

And

“I’ve tried to reduce profanity but I reduced so much profanity when writing the book that I’m afraid not much could come out. Perhaps we will have to consider it simply as a profane book and hope that the next book will be less profane or perhaps more sacred.” About his book, The Sun Also Rises in a letter, August 21, 1926

And

“Grace under pressure.”

And

“I’ve been in love (truly) with five women, the Spanish Republic and the 4th Infantry Division.” Letter to Marlene Dietrich, July 1, 1930

And

“All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn… American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.”

And

“However you make your living is where your talent lies.”

And

“Ezra was right half the time, and when he was wrong, he was so wrong you were never in any doubt about it.” On Ezra Pound, as quoted in The New Republic, November 11, 1936

And

“All my life I’ve looked at words as though I were seeing them for the first time.”

And

“There’s no one thing that’s true. It’s all true.”

And

“Never confuse movement with action.”

And

“If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.”

And

“Hesitation increases in relation to risk in equal proportion to age.”

And

“The individual, the great artist when he comes, uses everything that has been discovered or known about his art up to that point, being able to accept or reject in a time so short it seems that the knowledge was born with him, rather than that he takes instantly what it takes the ordinary man a lifetime to know, and then the great artist goes beyond what has been done or known and makes something of his own.” Death in the Afternoon

And

“There are some things which cannot be learned quickly, and time, which is all we have, must be paid heavily for their acquiring. They are the very simplest things and because it takes a man’s life to know them the little new that each man gets from life is very costly and the only heritage he has to leave.” Death in the Afternoon

And

“It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.”

And

“The first and final thing you have to do in this world is to last it and not be smashed by it.”

And

“There is nothing else than now. There is neither yesterday, certainly, nor is there any tomorrow. How old must you be before you know that? There is only now, and if now is only two days, then two days is your life and everything in it will be in proportion. This is how you live a life in two days. And if you stop complaining and asking for what you never will get, you will have a good life. A good life is not measured by any biblical span.” For Whom the Bell Tolls

Wikipedia: Ernest Hemingway

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, March 29, 2015 – John D. Rockefeller

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, March 29, 2015 – John D. Rockefeller

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“A friendship founded on business is better than a business founded on friendship.”

And

“Don’t be afraid to give up the good to go for the great.”

And

“Every right implies a responsibility; Every opportunity, an obligation, Every possession, a duty.”

And

“Good leadership consists of showing average people how to do the work of superior people.”

And

“I always tried to turn every disaster into an opportunity.”

And

“I believe in the dignity of labor, whether with head or hand; that the world owes no man a living but that it owes every man an opportunity to make a living.”

And

“I can think of nothing less pleasurable than a life devoted to pleasure.”

And

“I do not think that there is any other quality so essential to success of any kind as the quality of perseverance. It overcomes almost everything, even nature.”

And

“I know of nothing more despicable and pathetic than a man who devotes all the hours of the waking day to the making of money for money’s sake.”

And

“If you want to succeed you should strike out on new paths, rather than travel the worn paths of accepted success.”

And

The person who starts out simply with the idea of getting rich won’t succeed; you must have a larger ambition.”

And

“God gave me my money. I believe the power to make money is a gift from God . to be developed and used to the best of our ability for the good of mankind. Having been endowed with the gift I possess, I believe it is my duty to make money and still more money and to use the money I make for the good of my fellow man according to the dictates of my conscience.”

And

“The way to make money is to buy when blood is running in the streets.”

And

“The only question with wealth is, what do you do with it?”

And

“Do you know the only thing that gives me pleasure? It’s to see my dividends coming in.”

And

“The ability to deal with people is as purchasable a commodity as sugar or coffee and I will pay more for that ability than for any other under the sun.”

And

“I would rather hire a man with enthusiasm, than a man who knows everything.”

Wikipedia Page:  John D. Rockefeller

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