"Power concedes nothing without a demand.  It never did and it never will."  Frederick Douglass
 

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, October 26, 2014 – George Santayana

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, October 26, 2014 – George Santayana

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“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

And

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.”

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“A child educated only at school is an uneducated child.”

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“A conception not reducible to the small change of daily experience is like a currency not exchangeable for articles of consumption; it is not a symbol, but a fraud.”

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“A man’s feet should be planted in his country, but his eyes should survey the world.”

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“A string of excited, fugitive, miscellaneous pleasures is not happiness; happiness resides in imaginative reflection and judgment, when the picture of one’s life, or of human life, as it truly has been or is, satisfies the will, and is gladly accepted.”

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“All thought is naught but a footnote to Plato.”

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“Chaos is a name for any order that produces confusion in our minds.”

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“Character is the basis of happiness and happiness the sanction of character.”

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“Do not have evil-doers for friends, do not have low people for friends: have virtuous people for friends, have for friends the best of men.”

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“Friends are generally of the same sex, for when men and women agree, it is only in the conclusions; their reasons are always different.”

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“Happiness is the only sanction of life; where happiness fails, existence remains a mad and lamentable experiment.”

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“Intelligence is quickness in seeing things as they are.”

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“Knowledge of what is possible is the beginning of happiness.”

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“Life is not a spectacle or a feast; it is a predicament.”

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“Nonsense is so good only because common sense is so limited.”

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“The Difficult is that which can be done immediately; the Impossible that which takes a little longer.”

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“The dreamer can know no truth, not even about his dream, except by awaking out of it.”

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“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.”

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“The great difficulty in education is to get experience out of ideas.”

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“The young man who has not wept is a savage, and the older man who will not laugh is a fool.”

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“Theory helps us to bear our ignorance of facts.”

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“There is no cure for birth and death save to enjoy the interval.”

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“To delight in war is a merit in the soldier, a dangerous quality in the captain, and a positive crime in the statesman.”

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“To knock a thing down, especially if it is cocked at an arrogant angle, is a deep delight of the blood.”

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“We must welcome the future, remembering that soon it will be the past; and we must respect the past, remembering that it was once all that was humanly possible.”

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“There is nothing impossible in the existence of the supernatural: its existence seems to me decidedly probable.”

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“Skepticism, like chastity, should not be relinquished too readily.”

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“Beauty as we feel it is something indescribable: what it is or what it means can never be said.”

And

“The highest form of vanity is love of fame.”

And

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

Wikipedia: George Santayana

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, October 25, 2014 – General Robert Neyland

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, October 25, 2014 – General Robert Neyland

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“General Neyland’s 7 Maxims

1. The team that makes the fewest mistakes will win.

2. Play for and make the breaks and when one comes your way – SCORE.

3. If at first the game – or the breaks – go against you, don’t let up… put on more steam.

4. Protect our kickers, our QB, our lead and our ball game.

5. Ball, oskie, cover, block, cut and slice, pursue and gang tackle… for this is the WINNING EDGE.

6. Press the kicking game. Here is where the breaks are made.

7. Carry the fight to our opponent and keep it there for 60 minutes.”

And

“You never know what a football player is made of until he plays Alabama”

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“The team that makes the fewest mistakes wins”

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“To defeat a weak opponent is not the problem: The problem is to win when he is as good or better than you”

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“Gentlemen, touchdowns follow blocking as sure night follows day”

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“If my teams win, my press will be good. If we lose, the press can’t help me anyhow.”

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“People think I’m the greatest damn coach in the world,” said the great Bear Bryant, “but Neyland taught me everything I know.”

Wikipedia Page: General Robert Neyland

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, October 24, 2014 – Willie Mays

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, October 24, 2014 – Willie Mays

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“Baseball is a game, yes. It is also a business. But what is most truly is is disguised combat. For all its gentility, its almost leisurely pace, baseball is violence under wraps.”

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“If you can do that – if you run, hit, run the bases, hit with power, field, throw and do all other things that are part of the game – then you’re a good ballplayer.”

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“In order to excel, you must be completely dedicated to your chosen sport. You must also be prepared to work hard and be willing to accept constructive criticism. Without one-hundred percent dedication, you won’t be able to do this.”

And

“They throw the ball, I hit it. They hit the ball, I catch it.”

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“Every time I look at my pocketbook, I see Jackie Robinson.”

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“If you can do that – if you run, hit, run the bases, hit with power, field, throw and do all other things that are part of the game – then you’re a good ballplayer.”

And

“It’s not hard. When I’m not hitting, I don’t hit nobody. But when I’m hitting, I hit anybody.”

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“At ten I was playing against 18-year-old guys. At 15 I was playing professional ball with the Birmingham Black Barons, so I really came very quickly in all sports.”

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“In 1950, when the Giants signed me, they gave me $15,000. I bought a 1950 Mercury. I couldn’t drive, but I had it in the parking lot there, and everybody that could drive would drive the car. So it was like a community thing.”

Wikipedia Page: Willie Mays

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 23, 2014 – Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 23, 2014 – Lucius Annaeus Seneca

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“One of the most beautiful qualities of true friendship is to understand and to be understood.”

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“Our plans miscarry because they have no aim. When a man does not know what harbour he is making for, no wind is the right wind.”

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“A physician is not angry at the intemperance of a mad patient, nor does he take it ill to be railed at by a man in fever. Just so should a wise man treat all mankind, as a physician does his patient, and look upon them only as sick and extravagant.”

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“Life is the fire that burns and the sun that gives light. Life is the wind and the rain and the thunder in the sky. Life is matter and is earth, what is and what is not, and what beyond is in Eternity.”

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“We are more often frightened than hurt; and we suffer more from imagination than from reality.”

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“It is quality rather than quantity that matters.”

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“It is a rough road that leads to the heights of greatness.”

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“Life’s like a play: it’s not the length, but the excellence of the acting that matters.”

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“Love in its essence is spiritual fire.”

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“Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful.”

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“A happy life is one which is in accordance with its own nature.”

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“A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer’s hand.”

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“It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it is because we do not dare that they are difficult.”

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“True happiness is… to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future.”

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“A gift consists not in what is done or given, but in the intention of the giver or doer.”

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“A gem cannot be polished without friction, nor a man perfected without trials.”

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“Everything is the product of one universal creative effort. There is nothing dead in Nature. Everything is organic and living, and therefore the whole world appears to be a living organism.”

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“The bravest sight in the world is to see a great man struggling against adversity.”

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“Wisdom does not show itself so much in precept as in life – in firmness of mind and a mastery of appetite. It teaches us to do as well as to talk; and to make our words and actions all of a color.”

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“Expecting is the greatest impediment to living. In anticipation of tomorrow, it loses today.”

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“There is no person so severely punished, as those who subject themselves to the whip of their own remorse.”

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“Shall I tell you what the real evil is? To cringe to the things that are called evils, to surrender to them our freedom, in defiance of which we ought to face any suffering.”

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“There is no great genius without some touch of madness.”

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“Nothing is so wretched or foolish as to anticipate misfortunes. What madness is it to be expecting evil before it comes.”

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“Be wary of the man who urges an action in which he himself incurs no risk.”

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“It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor.”

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“Everywhere means nowhere. When a person spends all his time in foreign travel, he ends by having many acquaintances, but no friends.”

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“Live among men as if God beheld you; speak with God as if men were listening.”

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“Men do not care how nobly they live, but only how long, although it is within the reach of every man to live nobly, but within no man’s power to live long.”

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“God is near you, with you, and in you. Thus I say, Lucilius: there sits a holy spirit within us, a watcher of our right and wrong doing, and a guardian…”

And

“Treat your inferiors as you would be treated by your betters.”

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“You can tell the character of every man when you see how he gives and receives praise.”

Wikipedia: Lucius Annaeus Seneca

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, October 22, 2014 – Ben Bradlee

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, October 22, 2014 – Ben Bradlee

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Two Coaches Hot Seat members walking down a street in Washington DC in the late 1980s see Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee walking towards us. One of the CHS Members says, “Hey, that is Ben Bradlee.” Ben Bradlee looks over at the two of us and says, “That’s right kid!”

And

“You never monkey with the truth.”

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“Maybe some of today’s papers have too many ‘feel-good’ features, but there is a lot of good news out there.”

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“I must be out of it, but I don’t know any good journalists who have excused Clinton’s problems.”

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“The really tough thing would have been to decide to take Woodward and Bernstein off the story. They were carrying the coal for us – in that their stories were right.”

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“I think he had a strange, passionate devotion to the truth and a horror at what he saw going on.”

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“Sure, some journalists use anonymous sources just because they’re lazy and I think editors ought to insist on more precise identification even if they remain anonymous.”

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“I never believed that Nixon could fully resurrect himself. And the proof of that was in the obits.”

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“If an investigative reporter finds out that someone has been robbing the store, that may be ‘gotcha’ journalism, but it’s also good journalism.”

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“The biggest difference between Kennedy and Nixon, as far as the press is concerned, is simply this: Jack Kennedy really liked newspaper people and he really enjoyed sparring with journalists.”

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“In 1984, after The Post published information about a satellite payload over protests from Reagan Administration officials, a number of people wrote in questioning Ben’s patriotism, suggesting he worked for the Kremlin, et cetera. One writer in particular pushed Ben’s buttons by asking, “What did you do during WWII?” This is Ben’s response, said to be among Kay Graham’s favorites:

Dear Asshole:

I suspect I did more for my country in the war than you did. I spent four years in destroyers in the Pacific Ocean. My theater ribbon has 10 battle stars in it.

That’s just for starters.”

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“As long as a journalist tells the truth, in conscience and fairness, it is not his job to worry about consequences. The truth is never as dangerous as a lie in the long run. I truly believe the truth sets men free.”

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“Ben at Columbia Journalism School graduation, May 2007:

The real spiel I have for you is to have a good time while you are in your jobs. Have a good time. The newspaper will be great if you’re having a good time.”

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“There really isn’t enough time in the day to convene a task force on every little decision. If you’re publishing 140,000 words five times a day you’ve got to decide. And you’ve got to get it off the table and get on to the next one before you go crazy. You’ll never go home and you won’t be in any shape when you get home.”

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“Whenever people around Ben are worried about something that he doesn’t think is overly important, he will often say, as a way of providing context:

When the history of the world is written, this will not be in it.”

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“From Ben’s handwritten “editor’s rules”:

No. 6: Pick your fights. Don’t duck ’em, but don’t fight second-rate opponents.”

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“Mary Hadar, editor of the Style section, once presented a long profile to Ben right before he left for the night. When he came in the next morning, he told her that it was too long, and that she needed to cut it in half:

“Run it in two parts,” he told her.

“Ben, you can’t just take the story and cut it into two parts. It has arc. It has development.”

He said, “Yes, you can.”
She said, “How?”
And he took it, ripped it in half, and said, “Like that.””

And

“To Howard Bray, about the strike at The Post in 1975–6:

We’re talking about a bunch of criminals who slash tires and smash presses and hit women over the head with two-by-fours. I have no lint left in my navel for that.”

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“From a letter to George Crile, February 22, 1985:

If I could give you a piece of advice, one which I did not follow after [a long lawsuit] but which I wish I had followed, it is simply this: Don’t gloat; understand this key thought of Albert Camus—“There is no truth, only truths”; and get on with it.”

And

“From Tom Lippman, Post reporter, at Ben’s retirement roast in the Post newsroom, July 31, 1991:

I had become a sort of freelance guru on style and grammar and usage for people around the newsroom. One day I had an almost hesitant, almost blushing visit from Debbie Regan, who many of you will remember . . . was Ben’s secretary at the time. Ben had been dictating a letter on that little tape recorder, I guess, which Debbie had to transcribe, and she came over to my desk looking extremely uncomfortable.

She hemmed and hawed a little bit and she said, “Look, I have to ask you something.”

I said, “Yeah, what is it, Debbie?”

She said, “Is ‘dickhead’ one word or two?””

And

“To a newspaper publisher who called him “arrogant”:

To the Publisher:

Editors do run the risk of appearing arrogant if they choose to disagree with anybody who calls them arrogant.

You sound like one of those publishers who aims to please his pals in the community and give them what they want.

No one will call you arrogant that way. No one will call you newspaperman, either.”

Wikipedia: Ben Bradlee

Ben Bradlee, legendary editor transformed the Washington Post, Robert G. Kaiser, Washington Post

Postscript: Benjamin C. Bradlee (1921 – 2014), David Remnick, The New Yorker

Ben Bradlee’s Electric Glow, David Von Drehle, Time

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