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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, September 20, 2014 – Theodore Roosevelt

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, September 20, 2014 – Theodore Roosevelt

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“Keep your eyes on the stars, and your feet on the ground.”

And

“With self-discipline most anything is possible.”

And

“People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. The leader leads, and the boss drives.”

And

“A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.”

And

“The best executive is one who has sense enough to pick good people to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.”

And

“The boy who is going to make a great man must not make up his mind merely to overcome a thousand obstacles, but to win in spite of a thousand repulses and defeats.”

And

“In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.”

And

“The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first, the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life.”

And

“Get action. Seize the moment. Man was never intended to become an oyster.”

And

“I don’t pity any man who does hard work worth doing. I admire him. I pity the creature who does not work, at whichever end of the social scale he may regard himself as being.”

And

“The unforgivable crime is soft hitting. Do not hit at all if it can be avoided; but never hit softly.”

And

“Courtesy is as much a mark of a gentleman as courage.”

And

“When you are asked if you can do a job, tell ‘em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it.”

And

“To announce that there must be no criticism of the president… is morally treasonable to the American public.”

And

“The pacifist is as surely a traitor to his country and to humanity as is the most brutal wrongdoer.”

And

“Gentlemen: you have now reached the last point. If anyone of you doesn’t mean business let him say so now. An hour from now will be too late to back out. Once in, you’ve got to see it through. You’ve got to perform without flinching whatever duty is assigned you, regardless of the difficulty or the danger attending it. If it is garrison duty, you must attend to it. If it is meeting fever, you must be willing. If it is the closest kind of fighting, anxious for it. You must know how to ride, how to shoot, how to live in the open. Absolute obedience to every command is your first lesson. No matter what comes you mustn’t squeal. Think it over — all of you. If any man wishes to withdraw he will be gladly excused, for others are ready to take his place.” Address to U.S. Army recruits, 1898

And

“I wish to preach, not the doctrine of ignoble ease, but the doctrine of the strenuous life.”

And

“Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in that grey twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.”

And

“I have always been fond of the West African proverb “Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.”

And

“Death is always and under all circumstances a tragedy, for if it is not, then it means that life itself has become one.”

And

“The first requisite of a good citizen in this Republic of ours is that he shall be able and willing to pull his weight; that he shall not be a mere passenger, but shall do his share in the work that each generation of us finds ready to hand; and, furthermore, that in doing his work he shall show, not only the capacity for sturdy self-help, but also self-respecting regard for the rights of others.”

And

“Our aim is not to do away with corporations; on the contrary, these big aggregations are an inevitable development of modern industrialism, and the effort to destroy them would be futile unless accomplished in ways that would work the utmost mischief to the entire body politic. We can do nothing of good in the way of regulating and supervising these corporations until we fix clearly in our minds that we are not attacking the corporations, but endeavoring to do away with any evil in them. We are not hostile to them; we are merely determined that they shall be so handled as to subserve the public good. We draw the line against misconduct, not against wealth.”

And

“A man who is good enough to shed his blood for his country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards. More than that no man is entitled to, and less than that no man shall have.”

And

“Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.”

And

“No man is above the law and no man is below it; nor do we ask any man’s permission when we require him to obey it. Obedience to the law is demanded as a right; not asked as a favor.”

And

“The object of government is the welfare of the people. The material progress and prosperity of a nation are desirable chiefly so far as they lead to the moral and material welfare of all good citizens.”

And

“We wish to control big business so as to secure among other things good wages for the wage-workers and reasonable prices for the consumers. Wherever in any business the prosperity of the businessman is obtained by lowering the wages of his workmen and charging an excessive price to the consumers we wish to interfere and stop such practices. We will not submit to that kind of prosperity any more than we will submit to prosperity obtained by swindling investors or getting unfair advantages over business rivals.” Speech at Progressive Party Convention, Chicago, June 17, 1912

And

“A typical vice of American politics — the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues, and the announcement of radical policies with much sound and fury, and at the same time with a cautious accompaniment of weasel phrases each of which sucks the meat out of the preceding statement.”

And

“There are plenty of decent legislators, and plenty of able legislators; but the blamelessness and the fighting edge are not always combined. Both qualities are necessary for the man who is to wage active battle against the powers that prey. He must be clean of life, so that he can laugh when his public or his private record is searched; and yet being clean of life will not avail him if he is either foolish or timid. He must walk warily and fearlessly, and while he should never brawl if he can avoid it, he must be ready to hit hard if the need arises. Let him remember, by the way, that the unforgivable crime is soft hitting. Do not hit at all if it can be avoided; but never hit softly.”

And

“We stand equally against government by a plutocracy and government by a mob. There is something to be said for government by a great aristocracy which has furnished leaders to the nation in peace and war for generations; even a democrat like myself must admit this. But there is absolutely nothing to be said for government by a plutocracy, for government by men very powerful in certain lines and gifted with “the money touch,” but with ideals which in their essence are merely those of so many glorified pawnbrokers.”

And

“The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the Nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.”

And

“A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.”

And

“In any moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.”

And

“The United States of America has not the option as to whether it will or it will not play a great part in the world … It must play a great part. All that it can decide is whether it will play that part well or badly.”

And

“In life, as in a football game, the principle to follow is: Never flinch.Never foul. Hit the line hard.”

And

“We must ever bear in mind that the great end in view is righteousness, justice as between man and man, nation and nation, the chance to lead our lives on a somewhat higher level, with a broader spirit of brotherly goodwill one for another. Peace is generally good in itself, but it is never the highest good unless it comes as the handmaid of righteousness; and it becomes a very evil thing if it serves merely as a mask for cowardice and sloth, or as an instrument to further the ends of despotism or anarchy. We despise and abhor the bully, the brawler, the oppressor, whether in private or public life, but we despise no less the coward and the voluptuary. No man is worth calling a man who will not fight rather than submit to infamy or see those that are dear to him suffer wrong. No nation deserves to exist if it permits itself to lose the stern and virile virtues; and this without regard to whether the loss is due to the growth of a heartless and all-absorbing commercialism, to prolonged indulgence in luxury and soft, effortless ease, or to the deification of a warped and twisted sentimentality.” Nobel Lecture, 1910

And

“I abhor unjust war. I abhor injustice and bullying by the strong at the expense of the weak, whether among nations or individuals. I abhor violence and bloodshed. I believe that war should never be resorted to when, or so long as, it is honorably possible to avoid it. I respect all men and women who from high motives and with sanity and self-respect do all they can to avert war. I advocate preparation for war in order to avert war; and I should never advocate war unless it were the only alternative to dishonor.” An Autobiography, 1913

And

“There are many kinds of success in life worth having. It is exceedingly interesting and attractive to be a successful business man, or railroad man, or farmer, or a successful lawyer or doctor; or a writer, or a President, or a ranchman, or the colonel of a fighting regiment, or to kill grizzly bears and lions. But for unflagging interest and enjoyment, a household of children, if things go reasonably well, certainly makes all other forms of success and achievement lose their importance by comparison. It may be true that he travels farthest who travels alone; but the goal thus reached is not worth reaching. And as for a life deliberately devoted to pleasure as an end — why, the greatest happiness is the happiness that comes as a by-product of striving to do what must be done, even though sorrow is met in the doing. There is a bit of homely philosophy, quoted by Squire Bill Widener, of Widener’s Valley, Virginia, which sums up one’s duty in life: “Do what you can, with what you’ve got, where you are.” An Autobiography, 1913

Wikipedia: Theodore Roosevelt

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, September 19, 2014 – Bobby Bowden

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, September 19, 2014 – Bobby Bowden

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“He doesn’t know the meaning of the word fear, but then again he doesn’t know the meaning of most words.”

And

“Discipline to me is sacrifice; it’s willingness to give up something you want to do, so you can better yourself.”

And

“I learned a long time ago that you don’t have to go around using bad language and trying to hurt people to show how macho you are. That stuff won’t get you anywhere, it just shows lack of vocabulary and character.”

And

“The greatest mistake is to continue to practice a mistake.”

And

“I wasn’t afraid of nothing. I was concerned that our opponents. Just picture now. We’re trying to recruit this kid out of Tampa. OK, I go down and see him. An opponent coach comes there and says, ‘Hey, you don’t want to go to Florida State. Bobby Bowden’s got cancer. He’s 77 years old, he’s not going to be alive next year.”

And

“If short hair and good manners won football games, Army and Navy would play for the national championship every year.”

And

“Somehow, I went from being too young, to being too old. Somewhere in there I must have been just right.”

And

“Son, you’ve got a good engine, but your hands aren’t on the steering wheel.”

And

“I am not happy with moral victories. Those things are forgotten.”

And

“I’ve always said it takes more courage to stand back there and throw a ball knowing you’re fixing to get drilled than anything I can think of in football.”

And

“To have the kind of year you want to have, something has to happen that you can’t explain why it happened. Something has to happen that you can’t coach.”

And

“If somebody mistreats you, treat ‘em good. That kills ‘em.”

And

“I guess I’ll retire someday if I live that long.”

And

“He who gets the best players usually wins.”

And

“Don’t go to the grave with life unused.”

And

“There’s only about 6 inches that turns that halo into a noose.”

And

“But he played Miami. (Bowden on what they might chisel on his headstone)”

And

“You want to know what a real test of faith is? That’s when you go to church and reach into your pocket and all you’ve got is a $20 bill.”

And

“They look so good to me. I’m amazed they’re not on strike.” Bobby Bowden on Florida State losing to the University of Miami during the NFL strike

And

“The Good Lord might not want to take me, but He might be after the pilot.” Bobby Bowden, on his fear of small planes

Wikipedia: Bobby Bowden

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, September 18, 2014 – Franklin D. Roosevelt

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, September 18, 2014 – Franklin D. Roosevelt

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“A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself. Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.”

And

“Be sincere; be brief; be seated.”

And

“Confidence… thrives on honesty, on honor, on the sacredness of obligations, on faithful protection and on unselfish performance. Without them it cannot live.”

And

“I do not look upon these United States as a finished product. We are still in the making.”

And

“I pledge you, I pledge myself, to a new deal for the American people.”

And

“I’m not the smartest fellow in the world, but I can sure pick smart colleagues.”

And

“In our seeking for economic and political progress, we all go up – or else we all go down.”

And

“It is the duty of the President to propose and it is the privilege of the Congress to dispose.”

And

“It isn’t sufficient just to want – you’ve got to ask yourself what you are going to do to get the things you want.”

And

“Let us never forget that government is ourselves and not an alien power over us. The ultimate rulers of our democracy are not a President and senators and congressmen and government officials, but the voters of this country.”

And

“Men are not prisoners of fate, but only prisoners of their own minds.”

And

“Nobody will ever deprive the American people of the right to vote except the American people themselves and the only way they could do this is by not voting.”

And

“Rules are not necessarily sacred, principles are.”

And

“Take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly, and try another. But by all means, try something.”

And

“The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today.”

And

“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

And

“The overwhelming majority of Americans are possessed of two great qualities a sense of humor and a sense of proportion.”

And

“The truth is found when men are free to pursue it.”

And

“The United States Constitution has proved itself the most marvelously elastic compilation of rules of government ever written.”

And

“There are many ways of going forward, but only one way of standing still.”

And

“There is nothing I love as much as a good fight.”

And

“We have always held to the hope, the belief, the conviction that there is a better life, a better world, beyond the horizon.”

And

“This is preeminently the time to speak the truth, the whole truth, frankly and boldly. Nor need we shrink from honestly facing conditions in our country today. This great Nation will endure as it has endured, will revive and will prosper. So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life a leadership of frankness and vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory.” First Inaugural Address, 4 March 1933

And

“Happiness lies not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort.”

And

“The real truth of the matter is, as you and I know, that a financial element in the larger centers has owned the Government ever since the days of Andrew Jackson — and I am not wholly excepting the Administration of W. W. The country is going through a repetition of Jackson’s fight with the Bank of the United States — only on a far bigger and broader basis.” Letter to Col. Edward Mandell House, 21 November 1933

And

“Yes, we are on the way back — not by mere chance, not by a turn of the cycle. We are coming back more soundly than ever before because we planned it that way, and don’t let anybody tell you differently.” Speech at the Citadel, 23 October 1935

And

“In the future days which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms.

The first is freedom of speech and expression — everywhere in the world.

The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way — everywhere in the world.

The third is freedom from want, which, translated into world terms, means economic understandings which will secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants — everywhere in the world.

The fourth is freedom from fear, which, translated into world terms, means a world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and in such a thorough fashion that no nation will be in a position to commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor — anywhere in the world.

That is no vision of a distant millennium. It is a definite basis for a kind of world attainable in our own time and generation.”
The Four Freedoms Speech, January 6, 1941

And

“We must scrupulously guard the civil rights and civil liberties of all our citizens, whatever their background. We must remember that any oppression, any injustice, any hatred, is a wedge designed to attack our civilization.”
Greeting to the American Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born, Washington, D.C., 9 January 1940

And

“There is a mysterious cycle in human events. To some generations much is given. Of other generations much is expected. This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny.” Speech to the Democratic National Convention, 1936

And

“We do not see faith, hope, and charity as unattainable ideals, but we use them as stout supports of a nation fighting the fight for freedom in a modern civilization.” Speech to the Democratic National Convention, 1936

And

“Yesterday, December 7, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

The United States was at peace with that nation, and, at the solicitation of Japan, was still in conversation with its government and its Emperor looking toward the maintenance of peace in the Pacific.

It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. During the intervening time the Japanese Government has deliberately sought to deceive the United States by false statements and expressions of hope for continued peace.

As Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy I have directed that all measures be taken for our defense, that always will our whole nation remember the character of the onslaught against us. No matter how long it may take us to overcome this premeditated invasion, the American people, in their righteous might, will win through to absolute victory.

Hostilities exist. There is no blinking at the fact that our people, our territory and our interests are in grave danger. With confidence in our armed forces, with the unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable triumph, so help us God.

I ask that the Congress declare that since the unprovoked and dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, December 7, 1941, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese Empire.” Response to the attack on Pearl Harbor, 1941

Wikipedia: Franklin D. Roosevelt

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, September 17, 2014 – Chester William Nimitz

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, September 17, 2014 – Chester William Nimitz

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“I do believe we are going to have a major war, with Japan and Germany, and that the war is going to start by a very serious surprise attack and defeat of U.S. armed forces, and that there is going to be a major revulsion on the part of the political power in Washington against all those in command at sea, and they are going to be thrown out, though it won’t be their fault necessarily. And I wish to be in a position of sufficient prominence so that I will then be considered as one to be sent to sea, because that appears to be the route.” On his expectations of war, and that he would someday become the Chief of Naval Operations, in a conversation during the mid 1930s with his son, Chester W. Nimitz, Jr.

And

“A ship is always referred to as “she” because it costs so much to keep her in paint and powder.”

And

“Through the skill and devotion to duty of their armed forces of all branches in the Midway area our citizens can now rejoice that a momentous victory is in the making.”
After the Battle of Midway, CINCPAC Communiqué No. 3, June 6, 1942

And

“Is the proposed operation likely to succeed?
What might be the consequences of failure?
Is it in the realm of practicability in terms of material and supplies?”
“Three favorite rules of thumb” Nimitz had printed on a card he kept on his desk

And

“They fought together as brothers in arms; they died together and now they sleep side by side…To them, we have a solemn obligation — the obligation to ensure that their sacrifice will help make this a better and safer world in which to live.” Of those who died in the war in the Pacific, after ceremonies in Tokyo Bay accepting the official surrender of Japan, September 2, 1945

And

“The U.S.’s major strength factor and weapon is its economy. If you cripple it, you cripple the military.” As quoted in “According to Plan” in TIME magazine, March 13, 1950

And

“That is not to say that we can relax our readiness to defend ourselves. Our armament must be adequate to the needs, but our faith is not primarily in these machines of defense but in ourselves.” Speech at the University of California, Berkeley, March 22, 1950

And

“God grant me the courage not to give up what I think is right even though I think it is hopeless.”

And

“Sir Walter Raleigh declared in the early 17th century that “whoever commands the sea, commands the trade; whosoever commands the trade of the world commands the riches of the world, and consequently the world itself.” This principle is as true today as when uttered, and its effect will continue as long as ships traverse the seas.” Employment of Naval Forces, 1948

And

“The final objective in war is the destruction of the enemy’s capacity and will to fight, and thereby force him to accept the imposition of the victor’s will.”

And

“The qualities of the Nimitz character were apparent in his face, in his career, and in his heritage; combined these factors made him precisely the man he was and placed him in this particular situation at this moment in history. … He was not a cold man, or a bad tempered man — quite the contrary — to the world he presented a figure of almost total complacency; he seldom lost his temper or raised his voice. … It could be said that King was a driver who knew how to lead; it could also be said that Nimitz was a leader who conquered any personal urge to drive, and achieved his ends more by persuasion and inspiration to men under his command.” Edwin Palmer Hoyt in How They Won the War in the Pacific : Nimitz and His Admirals (2000), p. 28 – 29

And

“On April 13, 1943, Allied radio intelligence intercepted a message carrying the travel itinerary of Admiral Yamamoto. The detail in the message listed flight and ground schedules and included what type of fighter escort would be provided. Major Red Lasswell of FRUPAC broke the coded message. The decision of what to do with the information was left to Admiral Nimitz. Nimitz consulted Layton as to what the ramifications would be if Yamamoto were removed. They considered that he might be replaced with a better commander, and Nimitz felt familiar with Yamamoto as his opponent. Layton felt nobody could adequately replace Yamamoto, and based on this opinion Nimitz gave Admiral Halsey the authority to carry out the intercept of Yamamoto’s aircraft. On 18 April, a flight of P-38 fighters with specially selected pilots and equipped with long-range fuel tanks shot down Yamamoto’s aircraft, killing one of Japan’s top naval leaders.” Ricky J. Nussio, in Sherman and Nimitz: Executing Modern Information Operations (2001)

And

“He surrounded himself with the ablest men he could find and sought their advice, but he made his own decisions. He was a keen strategist who never forgot that he was dealing with human beings, on both sides of the conflict. He was aggressive in war without hate, audacious while never failing to weigh the risks.” E. B. Potter, Naval historian at the US Naval Academy, quoted on the cover jacket of his book Nimitz (1976)

And

“Of the Marines on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue.”

And

“He brought to his new job a number of advantages, including experience, a detailed knowledge of his brother officers, and a sense of inner balance and calm that steadied those around him. He had the ability to pick able subordinates and the courage to let them do their jobs without interference. He molded such disparate personalities as the quiet, introspective Raymond A. Spruance and the ebullient, aggressive William F. Halsey, Jr. into an effective team.” Robert William Love, on the rise of Nimitz to CINCPAC in The Chiefs of Naval Operations

Wikipedia: Chester William Nimitz

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, September 16, 2014 – Walt Disney

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, September 16, 2014 – Walt Disney

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“A man should never neglect his family for business.”

And

“All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.”

And

“All the adversity I’ve had in my life, all my troubles and obstacles, have strengthened me… You may not realize it when it happens, but a kick in the teeth may be the best thing in the world for you.”

And

“Disneyland is a work of love. We didn’t go into Disneyland just with the idea of making money.”

And

“I do not like to repeat successes, I like to go on to other things.”

And

“I have been up against tough competition all my life. I wouldn’t know how to get along without it.”

And

“I’d say it’s been my biggest problem all my life… it’s money. It takes a lot of money to make these dreams come true.”

And

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

And

“It’s kind of fun to do the impossible.”

And

“Laughter is America’s most important export.”

And

“Of all the things I’ve done, the most vital is coordinating those who work with me and aiming their efforts at a certain goal.”

And

“The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.”

And

“We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.”

And

“When you believe in a thing, believe in it all the way, implicitly and unquestionable.”

And

“When you’re curious, you find lots of interesting things to do.”

And

“You can design and create, and build the most wonderful place in the world. But it takes people to make the dream a reality.”

And

“You may not realize it when it happens, but a kick in the teeth may be the best thing in the world for you.”

And

“You reach a point where you don’t work for money.”

And

“Over at our place, we’re sure of just one thing: everybody in the world was once a child. So in planning a new picture, we don’t think of grown-ups, and we don’t think of children, but just of that fine, clean, unspoiled spot down deep in every one of us that maybe the world has made us forget and that maybe our pictures can help recall.”

And

“Once a man has tasted freedom he will never be content to be a slave. That is why I believe that this frightfulness we see everywhere today is only temporary. Tomorrow will be better for as long as America keeps alive the ideals of freedom and a better life. All men will want to be free and share our way of life. There must be so much that I should have said, but haven’t. What I will say now is just what most of us are probably thinking every day. I thank God and America for the right to live and raise my family under the flag of tolerance, democracy and freedom.” Radio Address, March 1941

And

“I suppose my formula might be: dream, diversify and never miss an angle.”

And

“A person should set his goals as early as he can and devote all his energy and talent to getting there. With enough effort, he may achieve it. Or he may find something that is even more rewarding. But in the end, no matter what the outcome, he will know he has been alive.”

And

“There is more treasure in books than in all the pirates’ loot on Treasure Island and at the bottom of the Spanish Main… and best of all, you can enjoy these riches every day of your life.”

And

“I could never convince the financiers that Disneyland was feasible, because dreams offer too little collateral.”

And

“Courage is the main quality of leadership, in my opinion, no matter where it is exercised. Usually it implies some risk — especially in new undertakings. Courage to initiate something and to keep it going, pioneering and adventurous spirit to blaze new ways, often, in our land of opportunity.”

And

“I do not make films primarily for children. I make them for the child in all of us, whether we be six or sixty. Call the child “innocence”. The worst of us is not without innocence, although buried deeply it might be. In my work I try to reach and speak to that innocence, showing it the fun and joy of living; showing it that laughter is healthy; showing it that the human species, although happily ridiculous at times, is still reaching for the stars.”

And

“When I started on Disneyland, my wife used to say, “But why do you want to build an amusement park? They’re so dirty.” I told her that was just the point — mine wouldn’t be.”

And

“Every person has his own ideas of the act of praying for God’s guidance, tolerance, and mercy to fulfill his duties and responsibilities. My own concept of prayer is not as a plea for special favors nor as a quick palliation for wrongs knowingly committed. A prayer, it seems to me, implies a promise as well as a request; at the highest level, prayer not only is a supplication for strength and guidance, but also becomes an affirmation of life and thus a reverent praise of God.”

And

“I have long felt that the way to keep children out of trouble is to keep them interested in things. Lecturing to children is no answer to delinquency. Preaching won’t keep youngsters out of trouble, but keeping their minds occupied will.”

And

“Actually, if you could see close in my eyes, the American flag is waving in both of them and up my spine is growing this red, white and blue stripe.”

And

“That’s the real trouble with the world, too many people grow up. They forget. They don’t remember what it’s like to be twelve years old. They patronize; they treat children as inferiors. I won’t do that. I’ll temper a story, yes. But I won’t play down, and I won’t patronize.”

And

“To the youngsters of today, I say believe in the future, the world is getting better; there still is plenty of opportunity. Why, would you believe it, when I was a kid I thought it was already too late for me to make good at anything.”

And

“Leadership means that a group, large or small, is willing to entrust authority to a person who has shown judgement, wisdom, personal appeal, and proven competence.”

And

“Do a good job. You don’t have to worry about the money; it will take care of itself. Just do your best work — then try to trump it.”

And

“I believe firmly in the efficacy of religion, in its powerful influence on a person’s whole life. It helps immeasurably to meet the storms and stress of life and keep you attuned to the Divine inspiration. Without inspiration, we would perish.”

Wikipedia: Walt Disney