"Power concedes nothing without a demand.  It never did and it never will."  Frederick Douglass
 

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, July 4, 2015 – Thomas Jefferson

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, July 4, 2015 – Thomas Jefferson

ThomasJefferson771771

“In CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson, July 4, 1776

And

“A wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, which shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government, and this is necessary to close the circlue of
our felicities.”

And

“Advertisements contain the only truths to be relied on in a newspaper.”

And

“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.”

And

“All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression.”

And

“Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.”

And

“As our enemies have found we can reason like men, so now let us show them we can fight like men also.”

And

“Be polite to all, but intimate with few.”

And

“Books constitute capital. A library book lasts as long as a house, for hundreds of years. It is not, then, an article of mere consumption but fairly of capital, and often in the case of professional men, setting out in life, it is their only capital.”

And

“Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done if we are always doing.”

And

“Do you want to know who you are? Don’t ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you.”

And

“Educate and inform the whole mass of the people… They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty.”

And

“Every citizen should be a soldier. This was the case with the Greeks and Romans, and must be that of every free state.”

And

“Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves are its only safe depositories.”

And

“Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.”

And

“Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear.”

And

“For a people who are free, and who mean to remain so, a well-organized and armed militia is their best security.”

And

“I am an Epicurean. I consider the genuine (not the imputed) doctrines of Epicurus as containing everything rational in moral philosophy which Greek and Roman leave to us.”

And

“I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.”

And

“I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.”

And

“I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be.”

And

“I know of no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them but to inform their discretion.”

And

“I own that I am not a friend to a very energetic government. It is always oppressive.”

And

“I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.”

And

“I was bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results they led, and bearding every authority which stood in their way.”

And

“If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.”

And

“In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.”

And

“It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world.”

And

It is our duty still to endeavor to avoid war; but if it shall actually take place, no matter by whom brought on, we must defend ourselves. If our house be on fire, “without inquiring whether it was fired from within or without, we must try to extinguish it.”

And

“Leave all the afternoon for exercise and recreation, which are as necessary as reading. I will rather say more necessary because health is worth more than learning.”

And

“Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.”

And

“My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.”

And

“Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today.”

And

“Never spend your money before you have earned it.”

And

“Nothing is unchangeable but the inherent and unalienable rights of man.”

And

“Our greatest happiness does not depend on the condition of life in which chance has placed us, but is always the result of a good conscience, good health, occupation, and freedom in all just pursuits.”

And

“The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only object of good government.”

And

“The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoin them.”

And

“There is not a truth existing which I fear… or would wish unknown to the whole world.”

And

“We never repent of having eaten too little.”

And

“When a man assumes a public trust he should consider himself a public property.”

And

“When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty.”

And

“When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe.”

And

“Whenever a man has cast a longing eye on offices, a rottenness begins in his conduct.”

And

“Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government.”

And

“Where the press is free and every man able to read, all is safe.”

And

“The most fortunate of us, in our journey through life, frequently meet with calamities and misfortunes which may greatly afflict us; and, to fortify our minds against the attacks of these calamities and misfortunes, should be one of the principal studies and endeavours of our lives. The only method of doing this is to assume a perfect resignation to the Divine will, to consider that whatever does happen, must happen; and that by our uneasiness, we cannot prevent the blow before it does fall, but we may add to its force after it has fallen. These considerations, and others such as these, may enable us in some measure to surmount the difficulties thrown in our way; to bear up with a tolerable degree of patience under this burthen of life; and to proceed with a pious and unshaken resignation, till we arrive at our journey’s end, when we may deliver up our trust into the hands of him who gave it, and receive such reward as to him shall seem proportioned to our merit. Such, dear Page, will be the language of the man who considers his situation in this life, and such should be the language of every man who would wish to render that situation as easy as the nature of it will admit. Few things will disturb him at all: nothing will disturb him much.” Letter to John Page (15 July 1763)

And

“All persons shall have full and free liberty of religious opinion; nor shall any be compelled to frequent or maintain any religious institution.”

And

“I say, the earth belongs to each of these generations during its course, fully and in its own right. The second generation receives it clear of the debts and incumbrances of the first, the third of the second, and so on. For if the first could charge it with a debt, then the earth would belong to the dead and not to the living generation. Then, no generation can contract debts greater than may be paid during the course of its own existence.”

And

“I consider the foundation of the Constitution as laid on this ground: That “all powers not delegated to the United States, by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States or to the people.” To take a single step beyond the boundaries thus specially drawn around the powers of Congress, is to take
possession of a boundless field of power, no longer susceptible of any definition.

The incorporation of a bank, and the powers assumed by this bill, have not, in my opinion, been delegated to the United States, by the Constitution… They are not among the powers specially enumerated…” Opinion against the constitutionality of a National Bank (1791)

And

“The system of banking we have both equally and ever reprobated. I contemplate it as a blot left in all our Constitutions, which, if not covered, will end in their destruction, which is already hit by the gamblers in corruption, and is sweeping away in its progress the fortunes and morals of our citizens. Funding I consider as
limited, rightfully, to a redemption of the debt within the lives of a majority of the generation contracting it; every generation coming equally, by the laws of the Creator of the world, to the free possession of the earth he made for their subsistence, unincumbered by their predecessors, who, like them, were but tenants for life.”
Letter to John Taylor (28 May 1816)

And

“A Decalogue of Canons for Observation in Practical Life”
1. Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day.
2. Never trouble another for what you can do yourself.
3. Never spend your money before you have it.
4. Never buy what you do not want, because it is cheap; it will be dear to you.
5. Pride costs us more than hunger, thirst and cold.
6. We never repent of having eaten too little.
7. Nothing is troublesome that we do willingly.
8. How much pain have cost us the evils which have never happened.
9. Take things always by their smooth handle.
10. When angry, count ten before you speak; if very angry, an hundred.”

Wikipedia Page:  Thomas Jefferson

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, July 3, 2015 – Thomas Paine

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, July 3, 2015 – Thomas Paine

ThomasPaine7744

A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.

And

“Character is much easier kept than recovered.”

And

“Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.”

And

“I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.”

And

“I prefer peace. But if trouble must come, let it come in my time, so that my children can live in peace.”

And

“One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.”

And

“Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best stage, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.”

And

“That which we obtain too easily, we esteem too lightly.”

And

“There are two distinct classes of what are called thoughts: those that we produce in ourselves by reflection and the act of thinking and those that bolt into the mind of their own accord.”

And

“These are the times that try men’s souls.”

And

“Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.”

And

“We have it in our power to begin the world over again.”

And

“We have every opportunity and every encouragement before us, to form the noblest purest constitution on the face of the earth. We have it in our power to begin the world over again. A situation, similar to the present, hath not happened since the days of Noah until now. The birthday of a new world is at hand, and a race of men, perhaps as numerous as all Europe contains, are to receive their portion of freedom from the event of a few months.” Common Sense, 1776

And

“THESE are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated.” The American Crisis, 1776

And

“It matters not where you live, or what rank of life you hold, the evil or the blessing will reach you all. The far and the near, the home counties and the back, the rich and the poor, will suffer or rejoice alike. The heart that feels not now is dead; the blood of his children will curse his cowardice, who shrinks back at a time when a little might have saved the whole, and made them happy. I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.” The American Crisis, 1776

And

“The circumstances of the world are continually changing, and the opinions of man change also; and as government is for the living, and not for the dead, it is the living only that has any right in it.” The Rights of Man, 1791

And

“It is the nature and intention of a constitution to prevent governing by party, by establishing a common principle that shall limit and control the power and impulse of party, and that says to all parties, thus far shalt thou go and no further. But in the absence of a constitution, men look entirely to party; and instead of principle governing party, party governs principle.” First Principles of Government, 1795

And

“I never tire of reading Tom Paine.” Abraham Lincoln, as quoted in A Literary History of the American People, 1931

And

“I consider Paine our greatest political thinker. As we have not advanced, and perhaps never shall advance, beyond the Declaration and Constitution, so Paine has had no successors who extended his principles.” Thomas Alva Edison

Wikipedia: Thomas Paine

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, July 2, 2015 – Benjamin Franklin

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, July 2, 2015 – Benjamin Franklin

BenFranklin777

Remarks of Benjamin Franklin after the signing of the US Constitution on September 17, 1787 in the words of James Madison:

“Whilst the last members were signing it Doctor Franklin looking towards the Presidents Chair, at the back of which a rising sun happened to be painted, observed to a few members near him, that Painters had found it difficult to distinguish in their art a rising from a setting sun. I have, said he, often and often in the course of the Session, and the vicissitudes of my hopes and fears as to its issue, looked at that behind the President without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting: But now at length I have the happiness to know that it is a rising and not a setting Sun.”

And

“All mankind is divided into three classes: those that are immovable, those that are movable, and those that move.”

And

“Do not fear mistakes.  You will know failure.  Continue to reach out.”

And

“Do not squander time for that is the stuff life is made of.”

And

“Hide not your talents.  They for use were made.  What’s a sundial in the shade?”

And

“Tell me and I forget.  Teach me and I remember.  Involve me and I learn.”

And

“The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness.  You have to catch it yourself.”

And

“A great empire, like a great cake, is most easily diminished at the edges.”

And

“Be at war with your vices, at peace with your neighbors, and let every new year find you a better man.”

And

“Being ignorant is not so much a shame, as being unwilling to learn.”

And

“Energy and persistence conquer all things.”

And

“How few there are who have courage enough to own their faults, or resolution enough to mend them.”

And

“It is the working man who is the happy man. It is the idle man who is the miserable man.”

And

“We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.”

And

“When you’re finished changing, you’re finished.”

And

“Where liberty is, there is my country.”

And

“Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning.”

And

“I believe there is one Supreme most perfect being. … I believe He is pleased and delights in the happiness of those He has created; and since without virtue man can have no happiness in this world, I firmly believe He delights to see me virtuous.”

And

“I think opinions should be judged of by their influences and effects, and if a man holds none that tend to make him less virtuous or more vicious, it may be concluded that he holds none that are dangerous; which I hope is the case with me.”

And

“Love your Enemies, for they tell you your Faults.”

And

“I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I travelled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.”

And

“They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”

And

“Let me add, that only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters.”

And

“Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

And

“These Names of Virtues with their Precepts were
1. TEMPERANCE. Eat not to Dulness. Drink not to Elevation.
2. SILENCE. Speak not but what may benefit others or your self. Avoid trifling Conversation.
3. ORDER. Let all your Things have their Places. Let each part of your Business have its Time.
4. RESOLUTION. Resolve to perform what you ought. Perform without fail what you resolve.
5. FRUGALITY. Make no Expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e. Waste nothing.
6. INDUSTRY. Lose no Time. Be always employ’d in something useful. Cut off all unnecessary actions.
7. SINCERITY. Use no hurtful Deceit. Think innocently and justly; and, if you speak, speak accordingly.
8. JUSTICE. Wrong none, by doing Injuries or omitting the Benefits that are your Duty.
9. MODERATION. Avoid Extremes. Forbear resenting Injuries so much as you think they deserve.
10. CLEANLINESS. Tolerate no Uncleanliness in Body, Clothes, or Habitation.
11. TRANQUILLITY. Be not disturbed at Trifles, or at Accidents common or unavoidable.
12. CHASTITY. Rarely use Venery but for Health or Offspring; Never to Dulness, Weakness, or the Injury of your own or another’s Peace or Reputation.
13. HUMILITY. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.”

Wikipedia Page:  Benjamin Franklin

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, July 1, 2015 – James Madison

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, July 1, 2015 – James Madison

JamesMadison828811

“The circulation of confidence is better than the circulation of money.”

And

“The advancement and diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.”

And

“Liberty may be endangered by the abuse of liberty, but also by the abuse of power.”

And

“If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.”

And

“The essence of Government is power; and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse.”

And

“Philosophy is common sense with big words.”

And

“America was indebted to immigration for her settlement and prosperity. That part of America which had encouraged them most had advanced most rapidly in population, agriculture and the arts.”

And

“A well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained in arms, is the best most natural defense of a free country.”

And

“A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce, or a tragedy, or perhaps both.”

And

“Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.”

And

“The purpose of separation of church and state is to keep forever from these shores the ceaseless strife that has soaked the soil of Europe with blood for centuries.”

And

“If men were angels, no government would be necessary.”

And

“What is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.”

And

“The truth is that all men having power ought to be mistrusted.”

And

“In Republics, the great danger is, that the majority may not sufficiently respect the rights of the minority. “
And

“Let me recommend the best medicine in the world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant country, in easy stages.”

And

“The people are the only legitimate fountain of power, and it is from them that the constitutional charter, under which the several branches of government hold their power, is derived.”

And

“The happy Union of these States is a wonder; their Constitution a miracle; their example the hope of Liberty throughout the world.”

And

“No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.”

And

“Wherever there is interest and power to do wrong, wrong will generally be done.”

And

“War should only be declared by the authority of the people, whose toils and treasures are to support its burdens, instead of the government which is to reap its fruits.”

And

“To suppose that any form of government will secure liberty or happiness without any virtue in the people, is a chimerical idea.”

And

“What spectacle can be more edifying or more seasonable, than that of Liberty and Learning, each leaning on the other for their mutual and surest support?”

And

“There is no maxim, in my opinion, which is more liable to be misapplied, and which, therefore, more needs elucidation, than the current one, that the interest of the majority is the political standard of right and wrong.”

And

“Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions against danger, real or pretended, from abroad.”

And

“The personal right to acquire property, which is a natural right, gives to property, when acquired, a right to protection, as a social right.”

And

“The man who is possessed of wealth, who lolls on his sofa or rolls in his carriage, cannot judge the wants or feelings of the day-laborer. The government we mean to erect is intended to last for ages. The landed interest, at present, is prevalent; but in process of time, when we approximate to the states and kingdoms of Europe, — when the number of landholders shall be comparatively small, through the various means of trade and manufactures, will not the landed interest be overbalanced in future elections, and unless wisely provided against, what will become of your government? In England, at this day, if elections were open to all classes of people, the property of landed proprietors would be insecure. An agrarian law would soon take place. If these observations be just, our government ought to secure the permanent interests of the country against innovation. Landholders ought to have a share in the government, to support these invaluable interests, and to balance and check the other. They ought to be so constituted as to protect the minority of the opulent against the majority. The senate, therefore, ought to be this body; and to answer these purposes, they ought to have permanency and stability.”

And

“In time of actual war, great discretionary powers are constantly given to the Executive Magistrate. Constant apprehension of War, has the same tendency to render the head too large for the body. A standing military force, with an overgrown Executive will not long be safe companions to liberty. The means of defence against foreign danger have been always the instruments of tyranny at home. Among the Romans it was a standing maxim to excite a war, whenever a revolt was apprehended. Throughout all Europe, the armies kept up under the pretext of defending, have enslaved the people.”

And

“Wherever the real power in a Government lies, there is the danger of oppression. In our Governments, the real power lies in the majority of the Community, and the invasion of private rights is chiefly to be apprehended, not from the acts of Government contrary to the sense of its constituents, but from acts in which the Government is the mere instrument of the major number of the constituents.”

Wikipedia Page:  James Madison

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, June 30, 2015 – Michelangelo

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, June 30, 2015 – Michelangelo

Michelangelo28381

“A beautiful thing never gives so much pain as does failing to hear and see it.”

And

“Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it.”

And

“Faith in oneself is the best and safest course.”

And

“Genius is eternal patience.”

And

“It is necessary to keep one’s compass in one’s eyes and not in the hand, for the hands execute, but the eye judges.”

And

“Lord, grant that I may always desire more than I can accomplish.”

And

“There is no greater harm than that of time wasted.”

And

“Yet I am learning.”

And

“If you knew how much work went into it, you would not call it genius.”

And

“The promises of this world are, for the most part, vain phantoms; and to confide in one’s self, and become something of worth and value is the best and safest course.”

And

“What do you despise? By this you are truly known.”

Wikipedia:  Michelangelo

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