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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, May 31, 2015 – Oliver Cromwell

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, May 31, 2015 – Oliver Cromwell

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“A few honest men are better than numbers.”

And

“Not only strike while the iron is hot, but make it hot by striking.”

And 

“I had rather have a plain, russet-coated Captain, that knows what he fights for, and loves what he knows, than that you call a Gentleman and is nothing else.”  

And

“He who stops being better stops being good.”

And

“Keep your faith in God, but keep your powder dry.”

And

“The State, in choosing men to serve it, takes no notice of their opinions. If they be willing faithfully to serve it, that satisfies.”

And

“We declared our intentions to preserve monarchy, and they still are so, unless necessity enforce an alteration. It’s granted the king has broken his trust, yet you are fearful to declare you will make no further addresses… look on the people you represent, and break not your trust, and expose not the honest party of your kingdom, who have bled for you, and suffer not misery to fall upon them for want of courage and resolution in you, else the honest people may take such courses as nature dictates to them.”
Speech in the Commons during the debate which preceded the “Vote of No Addresses” (January 1648) as recorded in the diary of John Boys of Kent.

And

“I tell you we will cut off his head with the crown upon it.”
To Algernon Sidney, one of the judges at the trial of Charles I (December 1648)

And

“No one rises so high as he who knows not whither he is going.”

And

“Though peace be made, yet it’s interest that keep peace.”
Quoted in a statement to Parliament as as “a maxim not to be despised” (4 September 1654).

And

“I was by birth a gentleman, living neither in any considerable height, nor yet in obscurity. I have been called to several employments in the nation — to serve in parliaments, — and ( because I would not be over tedious ) I did endeavour to discharge the duty of an honest man in those services, to God, and his people’s interest, and of the commonwealth; having, when time was, a competent acceptation in the hearts of men, and some evidence thereof.”
Speech to the First Protectorate Parliament (12 September 1654).

And

“I desire not to keep my place in this government an hour longer than I may preserve England in its just rights, and may protect the people of God in such a just liberty of their consciences…”
Speech dissolving the First Protectorate Parliament (22 January 1655).

And

“We are Englishmen; that is one good fact.”
Speech to Parliament (1655).

And

“I would have been glad to have lived under my wood side, to have kept a flock of sheep, rather than undertook such a Government as this is.”
Statement to Parliament (4 February 1658)

Wikipedia Page:  Oliver Cromwell

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, May 30, 2015 – Lewis Grizzard

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, May 30, 2015 – Lewis Grizzard

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“I don’t think I’ll get married again. I’ll just find a woman I don’t like and give her a house. “

And

“I grew up in a very large family in a very small house. I never slept alone until after I was married. “

And

“Life is like a dogsled race. If you ain’t the lead dog, the scenery never changes.”

And

“It’s difficult to think anything but pleasant thoughts while eating a homegrown tomato. “

And

“Sex hasn’t been the same since women started enjoying it. “

And

“The game of life is a lot like football. You have to tackle your problems, block your fears, and score your points when you get the opportunity. “

And

“The public, more often than not, will forgive mistakes, but it will not forgive trying to wriggle and weasel out of one.”

And

“You call to a dog and a dog will break its neck to get to you. Dogs just want to please. Call to a cat and its attitude is, ‘What’s in it for me?’ “

And

“The only way that I could figure they could improve upon Coca-Cola, one of life’s most delightful elixirs, which studies prove will heal the sick and occasionally raise the dead, is to put rum or bourbon in it.”

And

“Being a newspaper columnist is like being married to a nymphomaniac. It’s great for the first two weeks.”

And

“Baptists never make love standing up. They’re afraid someone might see them and think they’re dancing.”

And

“I have three ex-wives. I can’t remember any of their names, so I just call ’em Plaintiff.”

And

“I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence.”

And

“In the south there’s a difference between ‘Naked’ and ‘Nekkid.’ ‘Naked’ means you don’t have any clothes on. ‘Nekkid’ means you don’t have any clothes on … and you’re up to somethin’.”

And

“Kinky sex involves the use of duck feathers. Perverted sex involves the whole duck.”

And

“Real estate agents are God’s plague on mankind when locusts are out of season.”

And

“Women who drink white wine either want to get married, sell you a piece of real estate, or redecorate your house. Either way, it’s expensive.”

And

“Lewis’ advice to Atlantans in case of nuclear war: “If you live on the South side of Atlanta, get on I-75 and go south. If you live of the North side of Atlanta get on I-75 and go north. If you are a Yankee get on 285.” (Note to all you Yankees — I-285 is a continuous loop around the city)”

And

“I get letters from people who say, ‘What have you got against women?’ What could I possibly have against women? I’ve married three of them.”

Wikipedia:  Lewis Grizzard

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, May 29, 2015 – Mike Slive

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, May 29, 2015 – Mike Slive

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Over the last few months we have been giving a lot of thought to Mike Slive’s retirement from commissioner of the SEC Conference and Mike’s remarkable run with the SEC over the past 13 years, and there really isn’t a lot we could say in this space that hasn’t been said by lots of people already including the below piece by Tony Barnhart on Mike Slive that is a brilliantly written piece about a brilliant man.

A few years back several Coaches Hot Seat members were invited to a retirement party slash roast of a well-known tech executive who was being sent out in style at a lavish dinner and party at one of San Francisco’s finest hotels. The party and roasting lived up to our expectations as this very fine man retiring after forty years working at the highest levels of technology in Silicon Valley was getting the send-off that he rightly deserved meaning he was being praised and ribbed hard as he was walking out the door.

Everyone in the room that night was very excited to see what the last speaker of the night was going to say about the retiring honoree because that speaker had been in a multi-decade business battle with the well-known retiring tech executive, and there had been some bad blood along the way so the likelihood of some great lines was high and the speaker did not disappoint as he got off some zingers that we can’t even repeat in the Coaches Hot Seat Blog which is saying something!

After about 10 minutes of the last speaker giving it to the honored retiree good the speaker then went silent after he got off a great laugh line and didn’t say anything for what seemed like an eternity, but was only 30 seconds or so. The speaker then looked across the entire audience and then down the dais at the retiring executive and said to a hushed crowd:

“I would like to finish by saying that certainly “X” and I have had our disagreements over the years and I have cussed his ass out in private more times than I can count, but for anyone that doesn’t know it already let me make this abundantly clear. Not only has “X” been a Helluva competitor and terrific businessman over the years, but the world is a better place today because of the life this very fine man has lived and for that I Thank You “X” and wish you the very best of luck in the future.”
Of course, the audience that night rose to their feet to applaud that very accurate statement about “X” which was said in the most heartfelt way possible by a man everyone in that room respected to the utmost.

To Mike Slive from the 117 Members of Coaches Hot Seat:

The world is a better place today because of the life you have lived over the years and for that we Thank You and wish you the very best of luck in the future.

Thank You Mike Slive and hopefully one of us will make it to Hoover, Alabama in July and tell you that in person.

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“The hostile atmospheres when you play on the road in this league are incomparable. If you can go through that [undefeated] and win this game, you deserve to be in the national championship game.”

And

“We really don’t have any concern about that. One thing this tragedy taught us is that we all need to be flexible.”

And

“The conference didn’t have to take any action of any kind,”

And

“Coaches develop relationships with these students, and if they come to believe in them as people, not just athletes, they want to give them the benefit of the doubt if they can. Not all of them make it. We know that. But we have given them the opportunity.”

And

“After reviewing all of the information, I felt this was the best decision for the game, … The safety of our student-athletes, coaches and fans is our priority.”

And

“One of the great things about the Southeastern Conference is our fans and our support — the importance of college football. On occasion that exuberance goes over the top. What we’d ultimately like to do is channel it on the field.”

And

“Hurricane Katrina has devastated the lives of victims in four of the SEC’s states, Alabama, Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi, and may continue to do so for months and years to come,”

And

“The MVP program will raise awareness about issues that can adversely affect our student athletes. It is important for the SEC to be aware of the challenges facing our student-athletes so that we can assist them whenever possible.”

And

“Coach Vaught certainly was one of the great icons in SEC football. If you look at the list of names (of) great all-Americans from here that played for him … you just get a sense of what he’s meant to this conference.”

And

“We’ll evaluate everybody. But in terms of the work ethic and the commitment of our officials, I think it’s very strong.”

And

“I used to go to more games than I do now. Every game you see in person you probably miss somewhere between five and 10 games.”

And

“Right now, there is peace in the valley. We hope to keep it that way for a little while.”

And

“No one person, no matter how popular, can be allowed to derail the soul of an institution.”

And

Tony Barnhart on Mike Slive, SEC Sports, October 2014

“The first time I talked to Mike Slive was in a ballroom of the Hyatt-Regency Hotel in Atlanta. The year was 2002 and the event was a reception to honor Roy Kramer, who in March had announced that he was stepping down as commissioner of the SEC after an ultra-successful 12-year reign.

Among the invited guests was the diminutive, silver-haired former circuit court judge who was then serving as commissioner of Conference USA. I saw Slive and his wife, Liz, from across the room and made a mental note to say hello before the night was over.

“You probably need to do that,” said a friend of mine who worked at an SEC school. “I’m pretty sure he’s going to be your new commissioner.”

My first reaction to this news? I knew Slive was from the North (Utica, N.Y.) with an Ivy League background (Darmouth College). I knew he had hung out a shingle after U.Va. Law School and had worked in administration with the Pac-10 before becoming a commissioner. But that’s all I knew. And as someone who grew up in the SEC and had been covering the conference as a reporter for almost two decades, I didn’t see any way this guy could replace Roy Kramer.

Kramer was a former coach (he won a Division II national championship at Central Michigan), a former director of athletics (Vanderbilt), and one of the most brilliant men I’ve ever met. And he was tough. The football coaches listened to Kramer even when they didn’t agree with him because he had been one of them. The presidents and the athletics directors listened to Kramer because from Day 1 he was looking 10 years down the road and could see it very clearly.

I just didn’t know if someone with Slive’s background would have the gravitas to wrangle the collection of powerful people with egos to match that was the SEC at the beginning of the 21st century.

We had a short, cordial visit. I didn’t bring up what I had heard. It wasn’t the time because we were there to honor Commissioner Kramer. But his smile and his handshake let me know that we’d be seeing each other soon enough.

On July 2, 2002 Mike Slive was introduced as the seventh commissioner of the Southeastern Conference. After the formal press conference at the SEC offices in Birmingham he met with a smaller group of reporters in a conference room. From the minute he sat down Mike Slive was comfortably in charge of the room. His words were thoughtful and measured. Like a good lawyer he had anticipated the questions and had his answers ready.

He knew that there would be a learning curve to the job but was confident he could handle it. He knew that he had just been handed the keys to one of most powerful vehicles in the world of college athletics.

But he also knew that his job not to be a caretaker. Mike Slive realized that his challenge was to take the world-class franchise that Roy Kramer had helped to build and to make it into something even better. I left Birmingham that day with no doubt that he would be a great commissioner.

That was the first memory that raced back to me on Tuesday when Commissioner Slive announced that he would retire on July 31, 2015. He will remain on as a consultant for four years. In a brilliant 13-year run he has:

**–Turned the SEC from a strong regional brand into powerful national brand with long-term television contracts and the creation of the SEC Network, which launched on Aug. 14.

**–Presided over what was nothing less than the Golden Age of SEC football, with seven consecutive BCS championships from 2006-2012. Auburn was 13 seconds short of making it eight straight back in January.

**–Added two strong institutions-Texas A&M and Missouri-to an already strong conference.

**–Maintained an across-the-board commitment to all 21 sponsored sports, which have recorded a staggering 75 national championships during his tenure.

**–Introduced the proposal that would eventually become the four-team College Football Playoff, which begins his season.

**–Spearheaded the movement to give the Power Five conferences greater autonomy in the NCAA governance structure.

**–Through the force of his leadership, increased the SEC’s commitment to diversity. He created the SEC Minority Coaches Database. He made sure everybody in the conference understood that the SEC was not going to pay lip service to diversity. The SEC was going to live it. In 2011 Kentucky played Vanderbilt in the league’s first-ever meeting of African-American head football coaches. It wasn’t a big story. To Slive, that was a good thing.

**–Launched the SEC Academic Initiative, which used the power of the athletics brand to highlight and advance the great accomplishments of the members on the academic front.

The list of Slive’s accomplishments as commissioner goes on and on. But what I really want to share with you today is not what Mike Slive did but the way in which he did it.

He has been the ultimate consensus builder. Like the good lawyer who never asks a question to which he doesn’t already know the answer, Commissioner Slive would make sure he had the votes lined up before the meeting ever took place. And no matter what the vote actually was, it would be unanimous when Slive walked out of the room.

He has always understood the importance of strong coaches, but those coaches always understood who was in charge. In 2009 a number of the SEC football coaches had been sniping at each other in public. At the SEC Spring Meetings in Destin Slive walked into the room and read his coaches the riot act. Problem solved.

“I’d say the commissioner made his point,” Steve Spurrier told me after the meeting.

When Slive took over as commissioner he made it clear that he would have zero tolerance for schools that knowingly broke NCAA rules. The rules were also changed so that if one member had a problem with another member in the area of rules compliance, that complaint would first go through the SEC office.

When Auburn was left out of the BCS championship game with a 13-0 record in 2004, the commissioner started putting together the idea for the four-team college football playoff. Slive’s original version was called a “Plus-One” and he presented the idea to his fellow BCS commissioners during a meeting in South Florida in April of 2008. Only one other commissioner, the ACC’s John Swofford, supported it.

Slive’s idea was shot down and he was clearly disappointed when we talked in a hallway outside the meeting room. I asked the commissioner if he actually floated the idea just to set the table for 2012, when the current BCS deal was scheduled to end.

He just smiled.

In 2008 Slive knew his fellow commissioners weren’t ready to make the change. He was betting that four years later they would be ready. And he was right. When two SEC teams-LSU and Alabama-played for the 2011 BCS championship the commissioners came around to Slive’s way of thinking.

His work ethic is legendary. If you’re on Mike Slive’s staff, be prepared for 6:30 a.m. meetings at Starbucks. George Schroeder of USA Today wrote a wonderful piece on the commissioner last summer.

The Quiet Man:  Mike Slive’s placid approach to SEC power, George Schroeder, USA Today

In that piece Schroeder quotes Slive’s daughter, Anna, on his ability, at age 74, to still outwork men half his age.

“He only has two speeds,” she told Schroeder. “High and off.”

In the interest of full disclosure, I need to point out here that I’ve been fortunate to have a close personal and professional relationship with Commissioner Slive. I have used him as a sounding board when I have had to make some tough career decisions.

Each year, on the day before the Spring Meetings begin in Destin, we sit down for about an hour and reflect on where the conference has been and where it is going. Those conversations invariably turn personal and every year I ask how much longer he wants to go at this pace. Last May he just said: “You’ll see me until you don’t see me.”

In June of 2012 he became a grandfather for the first time. In August of 2012 I became a grandfather. And every meeting we’ve had since begins with the sharing of photos-his of Abigail and mine of Sloane.

That’s what I was thinking about when Commissioner Slive announced that he would retire next July. Because at the end of the day it’s really not about the money you make or the power you accumulate or the championships you win. It’s about the lives you have touched.

Mike and Liz Slive have touched a lot of lives in their time at the SEC. Lucky for us, they will do so for many years to come.”

Wikipedia:  Mike Slive

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, May 28, 2015 – George Washington Carver

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Thursday, May 28, 2015 – George Washington Carver

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“Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom.”

And

“How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in your life you will have been all of these.”

And

“When you do the common things in life in an uncommon way, you will command the attention of the world.”

And

“Ninety-nine percent of the failures come from people who have the habit of making excuses.”

And

“No individual has any right to come into the world and go out of it without leaving something behind.”

And

“Since new developments are the products of a creative mind, we must therefore stimulate and encourage that type of mind in every way possible.”

And

“There is no short cut to achievement. Life requires thorough preparation – veneer isn’t worth anything.”

And

“Where there is no vision, there is no hope.”

Wikipedia: George Washington Carver

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, May 27, 2015 – Ulysses S. Grant

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, May 27, 2015 – Ulysses S. Grant

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“Although a soldier by profession, I have never felt any sort of fondness for war, and I have never advocated it, except as a means of peace.”

And

“I appreciate the fact, and am proud of it, that the attentions I am receiving are intended more for our country than for me personally.”

And

“If you see the President, tell him from me that whatever happens there will be no turning back.”

And

“In every battle there comes a time when both sides consider themselves beaten, then he who continues the attack wins.”

And

“Labor disgraces no man; unfortunately, you occasionally find men who disgrace labor.”

And

“Nations, like individuals, are punished for their transgressions.”

And

“The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on.”

And

“The friend in my adversity I shall always cherish most. I can better trust those who helped to relieve the gloom of my dark hours than those who are so ready to enjoy with me the sunshine of my prosperity.”

And

“Every human being, of whatever origin, of whatever station, deserves respect. We must each respect others even as we respect ourselves.”

And

“The right of revolution is an inherent one. When people are oppressed by their government, it is a natural right they enjoy to relieve themselves of oppression, if they are strong enough, whether by withdrawal from it, or by overthrowing it and substituting a government more acceptable.”

And

“…but for a soldier his duty is plain. He is to obey the orders of all those placed over him and whip the enemy wherever he meets him.”

And

“Leave the matter of religion to the family altar, the church, and the private school, supported entirely by private contributions. Keep the church and state forever separate.”

And

“There never was a time when, in my opinion, some way could not be found to prevent the drawing of the sword.”

And

“Everyone has his superstitions. One of mine has always been when I started to go anywhere, or to do anything, never to turn back or to stop until the thing intended was accomplished.”

And

“I never held a council of war in my life. I heard what men had to say – the stream of talk at headquarters – but I made up my own mind, and from my written orders my staff got their first knowledge of what was to be done. No living man knew of plans”

And

“I have acted in every instance from a conscientious desire to do what was right, constitutional, within the law, and for the very best interests of the whole people. Failures have been errors of judgment, not of intent.”

And

“The one thing I never want to see again is a military parade. When I resigned from the army and went to a farm I was happy. When the rebellion came, I returned to the service because it was a duty. I had no thought of rank; all I did was try and make”

And

“No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.”
To General S.B. Buckner, Fort Donelson, February 16, 1862

And

“God gave us Lincoln and Liberty, let us fight for both.”
A toast made by Grant before his operations in the Vicksburg Campaign, February 22, 1863

And

“I propose to fight it out on this line, if it takes all summer.”
Dispatch to Washington, during the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. May 11, 1864

And

“I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of N. Va. on the following terms, to wit: Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate. One copy to be given to an officer designated by me, the other to be retained by such officer or officers as you may designate. The officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged, and each company or regimental commander sign a like parole for the men of their commands. The arms, artillery and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officer appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage. This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside.”
Terms of surrender, given to General Robert E. Lee after the Battle of Appomattox Courthouse, April 9, 1865

And

“Though I have been trained as a soldier, and participated in many battles, there never was a time when, in my opinion, some way could not be found to prevent the drawing of the sword. I look forward to an epoch when a court, recognized by all nations, will settle international differences, instead of keeping large standing armies as they do in Europe.”

And

“The will of the people is the best law.”

And

“Oh, I am heartily tired of hearing about what Lee is going to do. Some of you always seem to think he is suddenly going to turn a double somersault, and land in our rear and on both of our flanks at the same time. Go back to your command, and try to think what we are going to do ourselves, instead of what Lee is going to do.”

And

I had known General Lee in the old army, and had served with him in the Mexican War; but did not suppose, owing to the difference in our age and rank, that he would remember me, while I would more naturally remember him distinctly, because he was the chief of staff of General Scott in the Mexican War.

When I had left camp that morning I had not expected so soon the result that was then taking place, and consequently was in rough garb. I was without a sword, as I usually was when on horseback on the field, and wore a soldier’s blouse for a coat, with the shoulder straps of my rank to indicate to the army who I was. When I went into the house I found General Lee. We greeted each other, and after shaking hands took our seats. I had my staff with me, a good portion of whom were in the room during the whole of the interview.

What General Lee’s feelings were I do not know. As he was a man of much dignity, with an impassible face, it was impossible to say whether he felt inwardly glad that the end had finally come, or felt sad over the result, and was too manly to show it. Whatever his feelings, they were entirely concealed from my observation; but my own feelings, which had been quite jubilant on the receipt of his letter, were sad and depressed. I felt like anything rather than rejoicing at the downfall of a foe who had fought so long and valiantly, and had suffered so much for a cause, though that cause was, I believe, one of the worst for which a people ever fought, and one for which there was the least excuse. I do not question, however, the sincerity of the great mass of those who were opposed to us.

Our conversation grew so pleasant that I almost forgot the object of our meeting. After the conversation had run on in this style for some time, General Lee called my attention to the object of our meeting, and said that he had asked for this interview for the purpose of getting from me the terms I proposed to give his army. I said that I meant merely that his army should lay down their arms, not to take them up again during the continuance of the war unless duly and properly exchanged. He said that he had so understood my letter. Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant, 1885

And

“The cause of the great War of the Rebellion against the United Status will have to be attributed to slavery. For some years before the war began it was a trite saying among some politicians that “A state half slave and half free cannot exist.” All must become slave or all free, or the state will go down. I took no part myself in any such view of the case at the time, but since the war is over, reviewing the whole question, I have come to the conclusion that the saying is quite true.”

And

We must go back to the campaigns of Napoleon to find equally brillant results accomplished in the same space of time with such a small loss.
Francis Vinton Greene in The Mississippi (1882) on Grant’s role in the Vicksburg campaign

And

If Grant only does this thing right down there — I don’t care how, so long as he does it right — why, Grant is my man and I am his the rest of the war!
Abraham Lincoln on Grant’s Vicksburg campaign, July 5, 1863

And

I wish some of you would tell me the brand of whiskey that Grant drinks. I would like to send a barrel of it to my other generals.
Statement attributed to Abraham Lincoln in response to complaints about Grant’s drinking habits, November 1863

And

“He (Grant) habitually wears an expression as if he had determined to drive his head through a brick wall, and was about to do it.”
Col. Theodore Lyman. in Meade’s headquarters, 1863-1865

Wikipedia Page:  Ulysses S. Grant

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