"Power concedes nothing without a demand.  It never did and it never will."  Frederick Douglass
 

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, September 30, 2015 – Herb Brooks

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, September 30, 2015 – Herb Brooks

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“Great moments are born from great opportunities.”

And

“We should be dreaming. We grew up as kids having dreams, but now we’re too sophisticated as adults, as a nation. We stopped dreaming. We should always have dreams.”

And

“You know, Willie Wonka said it best: we are the makers of dreams, the dreamers of dreams.”

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“You’re looking for players whose name on the front of the sweater is more important than the one on the back. I look for these players to play hard, to play smart and to represent their country.”

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“When you pull on that jersey, the name on the front is a hell of alot more important than the one on the back.”

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“I’m not looking for the best players, Craig, I’m lookin’ for the right ones.”

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“If we play ’em 10 times, they might win nine. But NOT this game.”

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“[as the players who were cut depart] Take a good look, gentlemen, cause they’re the ones getting off easy”

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“[making his team do sprints after a lackluster game] You keep playing this way, you won’t beat anybody who’s even good, let alone great! You wanna make this team? Then you better start playing at a level that’s gonna FORCE ME to keep you here! AGAIN!”

Wikipedia:   Herb Brooks 

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, September 29, 2015 – W. E. B. Du Bois

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, September 29, 2015 – W. E. B. Du Bois

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“There is but one coward on earth, and that is the coward that dare not know.”

And

“I insist that the object of all true education is not to make men carpenters, it is to make carpenters men.”

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“Believe in life! Always human beings will progress to greater, broader, and fuller life.”

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“The worker must work for the glory of his handiwork, not simply for pay; the thinker must think for truth, not for fame.”

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“The function of the university is not simply to teach bread-winning, or to furnish teachers for the public schools or to be a centre of polite society; it is, above all, to be the organ of that fine adjustment between real life and the growing knowledge of life, an adjustment which forms the secret of civilization.”

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“The cost of liberty is less than the price of repression.”

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“Education is that whole system of human training within and without the school house walls, which molds and develops men.”

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“Now is the accepted time, not tomorrow, not some more convenient season. It is today that our best work can be done and not some future day or future year. It is today that we fit ourselves for the greater usefulness of tomorrow. Today is the seed time, now are the hours of work, and tomorrow comes the harvest and the playtime.”

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“It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity.”

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“It is the trained, living human soul, cultivated and strengthened by long study and thought, that breathes the real breath of life into boys and girls and makes them human, whether they be black or white, Greek, Russian or American.”

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“Liberty trains for liberty. Responsibility is the first step in responsibility.”

And

“Education is that whole system of human training within and without the school house walls, which molds and develops men.”

And

“The cost of liberty is less than the price of repression.”

And

“Believe in life! Always human beings will live and progress to greater, broader, and fuller life.”

And

“A little less complaint and whining, and a little more dogged work and manly striving, would do us more credit than a thousand civil rights bills.”

And

“When you have mastered numbers, you will in fact no longer be reading numbers, any more than you read words when reading books You will be reading meanings.”

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“It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity.”

And

“The worker must work for the glory of his handiwork, not simply for pay; the thinker must think for truth, not for fame.”

And

“Children learn more from what you are than what you teach.”

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“The main thing is the YOU beneath the clothes and skin–the ability to do, the will to conquer, the determination to understand and know this great, wonderful, curious world.”

And

“Either America will destroy ignorance or ignorance will destroy the United States.”

And

“The most important thing to remember is this: To be ready at any moment to give up what you are for what you might become.”

And

“Herein lies the tragedy of the age:
Not that men are poor, – all men know something of poverty.
Not that men are wicked, – who is good?
Not that men are ignorant, – what is truth?
Nay, but that men know so little of men.”

And

“I believe that all men, black, brown, and white, are brothers.”

And

“Honest and earnest criticism from those whose interests are most nearly touched,- criticism of writers by readers, of government by those governed, of leaders by those led, – this is the soul of democracy and the safeguard of modern society” 

Wikipedia Page:  W. E. B. Du Bois

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Monday, September 28, 2015 – Napoleon Bonaparte

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Monday, September 28, 2015 – Napoleon Bonaparte

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“A man will fight harder for his interests than for his rights.”

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“A revolution can be neither made nor stopped. The only thing that can be done is for one of several of its children to give it a direction by dint of victories.”

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“A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of colored ribbon.”

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“Ability is nothing without opportunity.”

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“Courage is like love; it must have hope for nourishment.”

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“Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily.”

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“Four hostile newspapers are more to be feared than a thousand bayonets.”

And

“Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever.”

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“Great ambition is the passion of a great character. Those endowed with it may perform very good or very bad acts. All depends on the principles which direct them.”

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“He who fears being conquered is sure of defeat.”

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“I love power. But it is as an artist that I love it. I love it as a musician loves his violin, to draw out its sounds and chords and harmonies.”

And

“If you want a thing done well, do it yourself”.

And

“Impossible is a word to be found only in the dictionary of fools.”

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“It requires more courage to suffer than to die.”

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“Men are moved by two levers only: fear and self interest.”

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“Nothing is more difficult, and therefore more precious, than to be able to decide.”

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“One must change one’s tactics every ten years if one wishes to maintain one’s superiority.”

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“Take time to deliberate, but when the time for action has arrived, stop thinking and go in.”

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“The battlefield is a scene of constant chaos. The winner will be the one who controls that chaos, both his own and the enemies.”

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“The first virtue in a soldier is endurance of fatigue; courage is only the second virtue.”

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“The people to fear are not those who disagree with you, but those who disagree with you and are too cowardly to let you know.”

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“The strong man is the one who is able to intercept at will the communication between the senses and the mind.”

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“The truest wisdom is a resolute determination.”

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“To do all that one is able to do, is to be a man; to do all that one would like to do, is to be a god.”

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“Victory belongs to the most persevering.”

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“When soldiers have been baptized in the fire of a battle-field, they have all one rank in my eyes.”

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“With audacity one can undertake anything, but not do everything.”

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“If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks, glory would become the prey of mediocre minds…. I have made all the calculations; fate will do the rest.”

And

“Success is the most convincing talker in the world.”

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“Impatience is a great obstacle to success; he who treats everything with brusqueness gathers nothing, or only immature fruit which will never ripen.”

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“The fool has one great advantage over a man of sense — he is always satisfied with himself.”

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“How many seemingly impossible things have been accomplished by resolute men because they had to do, or die.”

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“At the beginning of a campaign it is important to consider whether or not to move forward; but when one has taken the offensive it is necessary to maintain it to the last extremity.”

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“In a battle, as in a siege, the art consists in concentrating very heavy fire on a particular point. The line of battle once established, the one who has the ability to concentrate an unlooked for mass of artillery suddenly and unexpectedly on one of these points is sure to carry the day.”

And

“The secret of great battles consists in knowing how to deploy and concentrate at the right time.”

And

“A man who has no consideration for the needs of his men ought never to be given command.”

Wikipedia:  Napoleon Bonaparte

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, September 27, 2015 – Steve Sabol

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, September 27, 2015 – Steve Sabol

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“Life is great. Football is better.”

And

“The autumn wind is a pirate. Blustering in from sea with a rollicking song he sweeps along swaggering boisterously. His face is weather beaten, he wears a hooded sash with a silver hat about his head… The autumn wind is a Raider, pillaging just for fun.”

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“I think in the NFL knowledge is power, and you try to get the knowledge by whatever means.”

And

“A perfect record does not mean that someone is the greatest. Rocky Marciano never lost a fight, but I never hear anyone say he’s the greatest heavyweight champion of all time.”

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“I never thought of what I was doing as a way to sell the NFL. I was making movies about a sport that I loved, about players and coaches that I respected. I wanted to convey my love of the game through film. And most artists convey their love through art. And my art and my love was expressed through film.”

And

“Lombardi, a certain magic still lingers in the very name. It speaks of duels in the snow and November mud… He remains for many the heart of pro football, pumping hard right now.”

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“Look at a football field. It looks like a big movie screen. This is theatre. Football combines the strategy of chess. It’s part ballet. It’s part battleground, part playground. We clarify, amplify and glorify the game with our footage, the narration and that music, and in the end create an inspirational piece of footage.”

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“I’ve always been fascinated by Picasso and how he would look at a single image through multiple perspectives and from separate moments in time. He would look at a woman’s face and he would see almost a three-dimensional look even though it was a flat canvas. I thought, well why couldn’t we do the same thing with a football play?”

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“When my father bid $5,000 for the 1962 Championship Game, that was a huge amount. It was double the bid the year before. Pete Rozelle was flabbergasted. Who was this guy who was willing to spend so much money on what seemed like relatively worthless rights to the NFL Championship Game?”

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“If there’s one thing I can’t stand, it’s not being noticed.”

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“I remember when we were making ‘They Call It Pro Football,’ which was our ‘Citizen Kane.’ The first line is ‘It starts with a whistle and ends with a gun.'”

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“If you can show something as complicated as two people falling in love with just music and camera angles, well, just think about what you can do with football.”

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“Football is a sport of emotions, and we have to capture that in our films.”

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“I’ve been very lucky in the freedom that I’ve been given. Every artist needs two types of freedom: You need the freedom to – the freedom to come up with an idea or treatment – and then you need the other half of the freedom, and that’s freedom from – somebody saying, ‘This is great. This is how I want you to do it.'”

And

“NFL Films has had one continuous, creative vision for 47 years. These are timeless things; timeless stories that we capture just like people go back and read Greek mythology.”

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“You know how I came up with the name ‘Road to the Super Bowl?’ It’s an homage to the old Bob Hope – Bing Crosby buddy movies – you know, like ‘Road to Zanzibar’ or ‘Road to Morocco.’ Can you tell? All I’ve done my whole life is go to movies.”

And

“So they talk about heaven, and I don’t know what is waiting for me up there. But I can tell you this: Nothing will happen up there that can duplicate my life down here. Nothing. That life cannot be better than the one I’ve lived down here, the football life. It’s been perfect.”

And

“To me, football is very personal. Even as a kid, I looked at football in dramaturgical terms. It wasn’t the score that interested me, it was the struggle.”

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“I’ve always believed in that famous quote from Karl Marx, something like; ‘Men make history, but not under conditions of their own choosing.”

And

“The pressure is suffocating down there; there’s no air to breathe. You make a mistake or come up just short in the Super Bowl, and it feels like the end of the world.”

And

Wikipedia:  Steve Sabol

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, September 26, 2015 – Omar Bradley

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, September 26, 2015 – Omar Bradley

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“Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death.”

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“Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it.”

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“Set your course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

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“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”

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“Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is a sort of an all-inclusive thing. If a man has character, everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.”

And

“We have men of science, too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. The world has achieved brilliance without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living. If we continue to develop our technology without wisdom or prudence, our servant may prove to be our executioner.”

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“Wars can be prevented just as surely as they can be provoked, and we who fail to prevent them, must share the guilt for the dead.”

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“The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.”

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“With the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents.”

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Military hero, courageous in battle, and gentle in spirit, friend of the common soldier, General of the Army, first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he embodies the best of the American military tradition with dignity, humanity, and honor. Gerald Ford, remarks upon presenting Bradley with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (10 January 1977)

And

An Armistice Day Address

By General Omar N. Bradley
Boston, Massachusetts
November 10, 1948

“TOMORROW is our day of conscience. For although it is a monument to victory, it is also a symbol of failure. Just as it honors the dead, so must it humble the living.

Armistice Day is a constant reminder that we won a war and lost a peace.

It is both a tribute and an indictment: A tribute to the men who died that their neighbors might live without fear of aggression. An indictment of those who lived and forfeited their chance for peace.

Therefore, while Armistice Day is a day for pride, it is for pride in the achievements of others—humility in our own.

Neither remorse nor logic can hide the fact that our armistice ended in failure. Not until the armistice myth exploded in the blast of a Stuka bomb did we learn that the winning of wars does not in itself make peace. And not until Pearl Harbor did we learn that non-involvement in peace means certain involvement in war.
We paid grievously for those faults of the past in deaths, disaster, and dollars.

It was a penalty we knowingly chose to risk. We made the choice when we defaulted on our task in creating and safeguarding a peace.

It is no longer possible to shield ourselves with arms alone against the ordeal of attack. For modern war visits destruction on the victor and the vanquished alike. Our only complete assurance of surviving World War III is to halt it before it starts.

For that reason we clearly have no choice but to face the challenge of these strained times. To ignore the danger of aggression is simply to invite it. It must never again be said of the American people: Once more we won a war; once more we lost a peace. If we do we shall doom our children to a struggle that may take their lives.

ARMED forces can wage wars but they cannot make peace. For there is a wide chasm between war and peace—a chasm that can only be bridged by good will, discussion, compromise, and agreement. In 1945 while still bleeding from the wounds of aggression, the nations of this world met in San Francisco to build that span from war to peace. For three years—first hopefully, then guardedly, now fearfully—free nations have labored to complete that bridge. Yet again and again they have been obstructed by a nation whose ambitions thrive best on tension, whose leaders are scornful of peace except on their own impossible terms.

The unity with which we started that structure has been riddled by fear and suspicion. In place of agreement we are wrangling dangerously over the body of that very nation whose aggression had caused us to seek each other as allies and friends.

Only three years after our soldiers first clasped hands over the Elbe, this great wartime ally has spurned friendship with recrimination, it has clenched its fists and skulked in conspiracy behind it secretive borders.

As a result today we are neither at peace nor war. Instead we are engaged in this contest of tension, seeking agreement with those who disdain it, rearming, and struggling for peace.

Time can be for or against us.

It can be for us if diligence in our search for agreement equals the vigilance with which we prepare for a storm.

It can be against us if disillusionment weakens our faith in discussion—or if our vigilance corrodes while we wait.

Disillusionment is always the enemy of peace. And today—as after World War I —disillusionment can come from expecting too much, too easily, too soon. In our impatience we must never forget that fundamental differences have divided this world; they allow no swift, no cheap, no easy solutions.

While as a prudent people we must prepare ourselves to encounter what we may be unable to prevent, we nevertheless must never surrender ourselves to the certainty of that encounter.

For if we say there is no good in arguing with what must inevitably come, then we shall be left with no choice but to create a garrison state and empty our wealth into arms. The burden of long-term total preparedness for some indefinite but inevitable war could not help but crush the freedom we prize. It would leave the American people soft victims for bloodless aggression.

BOTH the East and the West today deprecate war. Yet because of its threatening gestures, its espousal of chaos, its secretive tactics, and its habits of force—one nation has caused the rest of the world to fear that it might recklessly resort to force rather that be blocked in its greater ambitions.

The American people have said both in their aid to Greece and in the reconstruction of Europe that any threat to freedom is a threat to our own lives. For we know that unless free peoples stand boldly and united against the forces of aggression, they may fall wretchedly, one by one, into the web of oppression.

It is fear of the brutal unprincipled use of force by reckless nations that might ignore the vast reserves of our defensive strength that has caused the American people to enlarge their air, naval, and ground arms.

Reluctant as we are to muster this costly strength, we must leave no chance for miscalculation in the mind of any aggressor.

Because in the United States it is the people who are sovereign, the Government is theirs to speak their voice and to voice their will, truthfully and without distortion.

We, the American people, can stand cleanly before the entire world and say plainly to any state:

“This Government will not assail you.

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressor.”

Since the origin of the American people, their chief trait has been the hatred of war. And yet these American people are ready to take up their arms against aggression and destroy if need be by their might any nation which would violate the peace of the world.

There can be no compromise with aggression anywhere in the world. For aggression multiplies—in rapid succession—disregard for the rights of man. Freedom when threatened anywhere is at once threatened everywhere.

NO MORE convincing an avowal of their peaceful intentions could have been made by the American people than by their offer to submit to United Nations the secret of the atom bomb. Our willingness to surrender this trump advantage that atomic energy might be used for the peaceful welfare of mankind splintered the contentions of those word-warmakers that our atom had been teamed with the dollar for imperialistic gain.

Yet because we asked adequate guarantees and freedom of world-wide inspection by the community of nations itself, our offer was declined and the atom has been recruited into this present contest of nerves. To those people who contend that secrecy and medieval sovereignty are more precious than a system of atomic control, I can only reply that it is a cheap price to pay for peace.

The atom bomb is far more than a military weapon. It may—as Bernard Baruch once said—contain the choice between the quick and the dead. We dare not forget that the advantage in atomic warfare lies with aggression and surprise. If we become engaged in an atom bomb race, we may simply lull ourselves to sleep behind an atomic stockpile. The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.

WITH the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents. Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have many men of science; too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. Man is stumbling blindly through a spiritual darkness while toying with the precarious secrets of life and death. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and to progress.

IN OUR concentration on the tactics of strength and resourcefulness which have been used in the contest for blockaded Berlin, we must not forget that we are also engaged in a long-range conflict of ideas. Democracy can withstand ideological attacks if democracy will provide earnestly and liberally for the welfare of its people. To defend democracy against attack, men must value freedom. And to value freedom they must benefit by it in happier and more secure lives for their wives and their children.

Throughout this period of tension in which we live, the American people must demonstrate conclusively to all other peoples of the world that democracy not only guarantees man’s human freedom but that it guarantees his economic dignity and progress as well. To practice freedom and make it work, we must cherish the individual; we must provide him the opportunities for reward and impress upon him the responsibilities a free man bears to the society in which he lives.”

Wikipedia Page: Omar Bradley

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