"Power concedes nothing without a demand.  It never did and it never will."  Frederick Douglass
 

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, January 17, 2017 – Johnny Unitas

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, January 17, 2017 – Johnny Unitas

JohnnyU66

“There is a difference between conceit and confidence. Conceit is bragging about yourself. Confidence means you believe you can get the job done.”

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“I always thought I could play pro ball. I had confidence in my ability, You have to. If you don’t who will?”

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“My father was totally dedicated to this game and made sure everybody on the team was just as dedicated, because it is the ultimate team sport.”

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“Anything I do, I always have a reason for.”

Wikipedia:  Johnny Unitas

JohnnyU1

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Monday, January 16, 2017 – Martin Luther King, Jr.

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Monday, January 16, 2017 – Martin Luther King, Jr.

“A genuine leader is not a searcher for consensus but a molder of consensus.”

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“A nation or civilization that continues to produce soft-minded men purchases its own spiritual death on the installment plan.”

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“Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase.”

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“If a man hasn’t discovered something that he will die for, he isn’t fit to live.”

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“There is nothing more tragic than to find an individual bogged down in the length of life, devoid of breadth.”

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“Whatever your life’s work is, do it well. A man should do his job so well that the living, the dead, and the unborn could do it no better.”

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“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.”

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“Men often hate each other because they fear each other; they fear each other because they don’t know each other; they don’t know each other because they can not communicate; they can not communicate because they are separated.”

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“We must live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”

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“On some positions, Cowardice asks the question, “Is it safe?” Expediency asks the question, “Is it politic?” And Vanity comes along and asks the question, “Is it popular?” But Conscience asks the question “Is it right?” And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular, but he must do it because Conscience tells him it is right.”

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“I say to you that our goal is freedom, and I believe we are going to get there because however much she strays away from it, the goal of America is freedom.”

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“Peace for Israel means security, and we must stand with all our might to protect its right to exist, its territorial integrity. I see Israel as one of the great outposts of democracy in the world, and a marvelous example of what can be done, how desert land can be transformed into an oasis of brotherhood and democracy. Peace for Israel means security and that security must be a reality.”

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“The tough mind is sharp and penetrating, breaking through the crust of legends and myths and sifting the true from the false. The tough-minded individual is astute and discerning. He has a strong austere quality that makes for firmness of purpose and solidness of commitment. Who doubts that this toughness is one of man’s greatest needs? Rarely do we find men who willingly engage in hard, solid thinking. There is an almost universal quest for easy answers and half-baked solutions. Nothing pains some people more than having to think.”

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“Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

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“The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

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“We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.”

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“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

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“Every man must decide whether he will walk in the light of creative altruism or in the darkness of destructive selfishness.”

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“Rarely do we find men who willingly engage in hard, solid thinking. There is an almost universal quest for easy answers and half-baked solutions. Nothing pains some people more than having to think.”

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“The first question which the priest and the Levite asked was: ‘If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?’ But… the good Samaritan reversed the question: ‘If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?'”

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“Let us not wallow in the valley of despair. I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.” I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state, sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.”

“I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor’s lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.”

“This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with a new meaning, “My country, ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring.” And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania! Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado! Let freedom ring from the curvaceous peaks of California! But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia! Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee! Let freedom ring from every hill and every molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

“When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

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“The time is always right to do what’s right.”

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“Each of us lives in two realms, the “within” and the “without.” The within of our lives is somehow found in the realm of ends, the without in the realm of means. The within of our [lives], the bottom — that realm of spiritual ends expressed in art, literature, morals, and religion for which at best we live. The without of our lives is that realm of instrumentalities, techniques, mechanisms by which we live. Now the great temptation of life and the great tragedy of life is that so often we allow the without of our lives to absorb the within of our lives. The great tragedy of life is that too often we allow the means by which we live to outdistance the ends for which we live.”

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“Yes, if you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice; say that I was a drum major for peace; I was a drum major for righteousness. And all of the other shallow things will not matter. I won’t have any money to leave behind. I won’t have the fine and luxurious things of life to leave behind. But I just want to leave a committed life behind. And that’s all I want to say.”

“We all have the drum major instinct. We all want to be important, to surpass others, to achieve distinction, to lead the parade. … And the great issue of life is to harness the drum major instinct. It is a good instinct if you don’t distort it and pervert it. Don’t give it up. Keep feeling the need for being important. Keep feeling the need for being first. But I want you to be the first in love. I want you to be the first in moral excellence. I want you to be the first in generosity.”

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“Well, I don’t know what will happen now. We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn’t matter with me now. Because I’ve been to the mountaintop. And I don’t mind. Like any man, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people will get to the promised land. And I’m happy, tonight. I’m not worried about anything. I’m not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.”

Wikipedia: Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, January 14, 2017 – Frederick Douglass

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Sunday, January 15, 2017 – Frederick Douglass

“A man’s character always takes its hue, more or less, from the form and color of things about him.”

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“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.”

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“Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have the exact measure of the injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them.”

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“I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence.”

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“I am a Republican, a black, dyed in the wool Republican, and I never intend to belong to any other party than the party of freedom and progress.”

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“A battle lost or won is easily described, understood, and appreciated, but the moral growth of a great nation requires reflection, as well as observation, to appreciate it.”

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“One and God make a majority.”

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“I didn’t know I was a slave until I found out I couldn’t do the things I wanted.”

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“The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppose.”

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“A gentleman will not insult me, and no man not a gentleman can insult me.”

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“To suppress free speech is a double wrong. It violates the rights of the hearer as well as those of the speaker.”

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“The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous.”

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“A little learning, indeed, may be a dangerous thing, but the want of learning is a calamity to any people.”

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“The white man’s happiness cannot be purchased by the black man’s misery.”

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“Without a struggle, there can be no progress.”

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“It is not light that we need, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake.”

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“Man’s greatness consists in his ability to do and the proper application of his powers to things needed to be done.”

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“People might not get all they work for in this world, but they must certainly work for all they get.”

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“If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters. This struggle may be a moral one; or it may be a physical one; or it may be both moral and physical; but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what a people will submit to, and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress. Men may not get all they pay for in this world; but they must pay for all they get. If we ever get free from all the oppressions and wrongs heaped upon us, we must pay for their removal. We must do this by labor, by suffering, by sacrifice, and, if needs be, by our lives, and the lives of others.”

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“No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck.”

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“Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.”

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“Whatever the future may have in store for us, one thing is certain — this new revolution in human thought will never go backward. When a great truth once gets abroad in the world, no power on earth can imprison it, or prescribe its limits, or suppress it. It is bound to go on till it becomes the thought of the world. Such a truth is woman’s right to equal liberty with man. She was born with it. It was hers before she comprehended it. It is inscribed upon all the powers and faculties of her soul, and no custom, law, or usage can ever destroy it. Now that it has got fairly fixed in the minds of the few, it is bound to become fixed in the minds of the many, and be supported at last by a great cloud of witnesses, which no man can number and no power can withstand.”

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“Mr. Lincoln was not only a great President, but a great man — too great to be small in anything. In his company I was never in any way reminded of my humble origin, or of my unpopular color.”

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“I look upon my departure from Colonel Lloyd’s plantation as one of the most interesting events of my life. It is possible, and even quite probable, that but for the mere circumstance of being removed from that plantation to Baltimore, I should have to-day, instead of being here seated by my own table, in the enjoyment of freedom and the happiness of home, writing this Narrative, been confined in the galling chains of slavery. Going to live at Baltimore laid the foundation, and opened the gateway, to all my subsequent prosperity. I have ever regarded it as the first plain manifestation of that kind providence which has ever since attended me, and marked my life with so many favors. I regarded the selection of myself as being somewhat remarkable. There were a number of slave children that might have been sent from the plantation to Baltimore. There were those younger, those older, and those of the same age. I was chosen from among them all, and was the first, last, and only choice.”

Wikipedia Page: Frederick Douglass

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, January 14, 2017 – James Dean

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Saturday, January 14, 2017 – James Dean

JamesDean737

“Dream as if you’ll live forever. Live as if you’ll die today.”

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“There is no way to be truly great in this world. We are all impaled on the crook of conditioning.”

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“Being an actor is the loneliest thing in the world. You are all alone with your concentration and imagination, and that’s all you have.”

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“Only the gentle are ever really strong.”

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“Being a good actor isn’t easy. Being a man is even harder. I want to be both before I’m done.”

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“When an actor plays a scene exactly the way a director orders, it isn’t acting. It’s following instructions. Anyone with the physical qualifications can do that.”

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“If a man can bridge the gap between life and death, if he can live on after he’s dead, then maybe he was a great man.”

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“To grasp the full significance of life is the actor’s duty; to interpret it is his problem; and to express it is his dedication.”

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“The gratification comes in the doing, not in the results.”

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“The only greatness for man is immortality.”

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“I also became close to nature, and am now able to appreciate the beauty with which this world is endowed.”

Wikipedia: James Dean

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Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, January 13, 2017 – Albert Einstein

Mad As Hell And… Quotes of the Day – Friday, January 13, 2017 – Albert Einstein

AlbertEinstein8888

“A man should look for what he is, and not for what he thinks should be.”

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“A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.”

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“All that is valuable in human society depends upon the opportunity for development accorded the individual.”

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“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex… It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.”

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“Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school.”

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“Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.”

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“I think and think for months and years. Ninety-nine times, the conclusion is false. The hundredth time I am right.”

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“Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”

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“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.”

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“Most people say that is it is the intellect which makes a great scientist. They are wrong: it is character.”

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“Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the former.”

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“People love chopping wood. In this activity one immediately sees results.”

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“Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.”

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“To raise new questions, new possibilities, to regard old problems from a new angle, requires creative imagination and marks real advance in science.”

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“You have to learn the rules of the game. And then you have to play better than anyone else.”

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“A happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell too much on the future.”

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“Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.”

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“Nature shows us only the tail of the lion. But there is no doubt in my mind that the lion belongs with it even if he cannot reveal himself to the eye all at once because of his huge dimension.”

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“I am by heritage a Jew, by citizenship a Swiss, and by makeup a human being, and only a human being, without any special attachment to any state or national entity whatsoever.”

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“Subtle is the Lord, but malicious He is not.”

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“I do not carry such information in my mind since it is readily available in books. …The value of a college education is not the learning of many facts but the training of the mind to think.”

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“I was sitting in a chair in the patent office at Bern when all of sudden a thought occurred to me: If a person falls freely he will not feel his own weight. I was startled. This simple thought made a deep impression on me. It impelled me toward a theory of gravitation.”

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“Try and penetrate with our limited means the secrets of nature and you will find that, behind all the discernible concatenations, there remains something subtle, intangible and inexplicable. Veneration for this force beyond anything that we can comprehend is my religion. To that extent I am, in point of fact, religious.”

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“If A is success in life, then A = x + y + z. Work is x, play is y and z is keeping your mouth shut.”

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“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.”

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“I never think of the future. It comes soon enough.”

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“The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is comprehensible.”

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“Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. The mediocre mind is incapable of understanding the man who refuses to bow blindly to conventional prejudices and chooses instead to express his opinions courageously and honestly.”

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“The important thing is not to stop questioning; curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when contemplating the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of the mystery every day. The important thing is not to stop questioning; never lose a holy curiosity.”

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“When a man sits with a pretty girl for an hour, it seems like a minute. But let him sit on a hot stove for a minute and it’s longer than any hour. That’s relativity.”

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“If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or objects.”

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“If I can’t picture it, I can’t understand it.”

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“The most beautiful and deepest experience a man can have is the sense of the mysterious. It is the underlying principle of religion as well as all serious endeavor in art and science. He who never had this experience seems to me, if not dead, then at least blind.”

Wikipedia Page:  Albert Einstein

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